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A Spark of Genius: A Conversation with James Jones



James Jones Jr. is the co-founder and CEO of Spark DJ, Inc.  He is a lover of music, engineering and experiences.   A continued example of the talent here in Minnesota.  We got the chance to have a brief conversation to ask him a few short questions about his journey as an entrepreneur.  We look forward to watching his continued success.

What is your Business and how did your entrepreneurial journey begin?
Spark DJ is a music platform that uses artificial intelligence to DJ your parties. My entrepreneurial journey began in college when I began DJing to pay for school. I got really into it because I loved using music to create these awesome experiences. At some point, I ended up having more offers for gigs than I could do. Instead of bringing on another DJ to cover the gigs I could not do, I came up with the odd idea of trying to create a software-based algorithmic clone (I was an engineering major).

What do you want people to know about your business and what sets it apart?
What makes Spark DJ unique is that we focus on a party experience rather than just “listening to music”. Party goers can send song requests to the host app from their phones and have their favorite tunes brought into the mix. Music goes from one to the next seamlessly, matching tempo and key and blending songs to create one seamless mix. And our software application reads your crowd to make sure that the music being played is always fun and relevant.

What or who has made the biggest impact on your entrepreneurial career so far?
John Boss, my co-founder, has made the biggest impact on my entrepreneurial career. He’s not only my business partner but one of my closest friends. He had a similar experience DJing through college to pay for school. Although we have heated debates about who was the better DJ, he has had a tremendous impact in making this idea a reality.

How does your entrepreneurial spirit contribute to the Twin Cities Business Ecosystem and Community?
John and I both take time to engage and support other entrepreneurs. We’re always up to grab a coffee or beer. We have been a part of programs and groups such as Graveti, COCO, Minnesota Cup, entrepreneurial and tech meetups, TechDotMN, etc. We also volunteer our time to provide business help to other startups and charities.

What has been the largest  success you have experienced as an entrepreneur?
One of our successes has been becoming semi-finalist in the Minnesota Cup. It was a great program that enabled us to meet many entrepreneurs and investors.

What advice would you give to other entrepreneurs just getting out of gate?
I’m not sure if we’re best position to provide too much advice as we’re still learning a lot everyday. But one of the things we’ve realized is how important relationships are. Many opportunities have come from building great relationship with others in the community.

What is it about Minnesota and how has it managed to keep you here?
Not only is Minnesota a great place because of the people and the support and excitement we’ve seen throughout the state, but also being in Minnesota has provided us cost-effective access to enterprise resources.

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One Story at a Time: A Conversation with Uzoma Obasi


Uzoma Obasi
is an entrepreneur, photographer, film maker, storyteller and creator. He is the Executive Producer of Creative Mind Studios and the founder of Midwest Creative Connection.  Another great example of the talent and skill that is housed in the Twin Cities of Minnesota.  We got the chance to have a brief conversation to ask him a few short questions about his company, advice for other entrepreneurs, why Minnesota and more.

Describe your business. What do you want people to know about your company and what makes it different?
Creative Mind Studios is a photo and video studio that focuses on business needs. We pride ourselves in our ability to help our clients tell their stories through still and motion pictures.

How does your company contribute to the Twin Cities business ecosystem and community?
We contribute by making high quality business photography and videography accessible to businesses of all sizes and budgets. Helping entrepreneurs and small business owners compete with the largest of companies.

What has been the largest hurdle and / or success you have experienced as an entrepreneur and business owners?
The largest success we have had is being hired by the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee to provide our photo and video services.

My biggest hurdle was finding the right studio space. I needed a space that fit my small budget but had the square footage I needed.

What advice would you give to other entrepreneurs?
Make sure that whatever you’re doing is a passion. Being an entrepreneur and running a business is hard work. Harder than showing up for a 9-5. If you are just in it for the money, you’ll burn out quickly.

How has the James J. Hill Center played a role in your entrepreneurial experience?
The James J. Hill Center has played an important role in helping network, learn and grow. I believe that the events and resources the Hill provides has been key to my businesses growth.

What is it about Minnesota and how has it managed to keep you here?
Minnesota is home. Even with the snow, ice and wind chill Minnesota has a way of feeling comfortable. I can’t imagine another place to raise a family and run a business. The people are genuine, and the culture is very diverse, which makes it a great climate to conduct business in.

Check out more on Uzoma Obasi and his projects.

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Showbiz Guy Wants to Move Bikes — Fast

Leah Kodner, Library Specialist from the James J. Hill Center, interviews entrepreneurs and 1 Million Cup presenter  Rich Kronfeld . As seen in the Pioneer Press, Startup Showcase on January 28th, 2017.
According to a 2016 study by the Outdoor Foundation, biking is the fourth most popular outdoor activity among adults, with 12.3 percent of American adults classifying themselves as regular bike riders. Some 26 million American adults ride bikes every year, for a number of different purposes.

Bikers ride for fun, both on city streets and on trails. And many bikers also use their bikes to commute to work. Of course, this is only feasible for bikers who live near enough to their workplaces, and for those who have access to relatively safe streets to bike on.
Rich Kronfeld started Kronfeld Motors in a desire to make biking faster and safer for these commuters. The result is a bike that, when pedaled, can move as fast as a car, while also including important safety features.

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Rahtmobile, changing name to Kronfeld Motors
Website: www.rahtmobile.com
Business Start Date: 2012
Number of Employees: 1
Number of Customers: None — yet

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE


Richard Kronfeld

Name: Rich Kronfeld
Age: 53
City you live in: Golden Valley
City of birth: Huntington, Long Island, N.Y.
High school attended: St. Louis Park High School
College attended: Bennington College, Bennington, Vt.

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?

A. I have been an entrepreneur and bike lover all my life. I sold tickets to watch movies in my parents’ garage as a kid, wrote and sold screenplays in Hollywood, appeared in the Paramount film “Trekkies” and produced and starred in a series I co-created and shot in Minnesota called “Lets Bowl” on Comedy Central. I’m also an Emmy Award-winning producer of the children’s series, “The Choo Choo Bob Show” on the Qubo/ION networks, which is also shot in Minnesota. I even entered and won a demolition derby in Anoka. I have volunteered for many organizations and currently serve on the board of Nechama Jewish Disaster Response. Now I have started an alternative-vehicle company, and my background in the entertainment industry taught me the importance of showmanship and new ideas. All my life, I have wanted to do something innovative and unique, and I intend to accomplish this with Kronfeld Motors.

Q. What is your business?

A. My company is Kronfeld Motors, formerly Rahtmobile. It’s the manufacturer of the world’s only highway-speed cycling vehicle. My industries are manufacturing and engineering. READ FULL ARTICLE…

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January Reference Round-Up

Lists, Leads and Trends…

  • Most of our researchers this month came from Minnesota, but we also received a visitor from Wisconsin, one from North Dakota, and one from Indiana.
  • Our librarians gave a presentation at the end of January on how to use library resources to learn how to research industry trends, how to expand a business into new markets, and how to research an industry. The presentation was designed with established business owners in mind.
  • Two researchers stayed after the presentation to do research, using the databases they had learned about in the presentations. Both of these researchers created marketing lead lists for their businesses, and one performed market research as well.
  • Several researchers this month were writing business plans. Some were writing them as part of a Women Venture class, and others were writing them on their own.
  • Many researchers came to the library to build lists of businesses, either as sales lead lists or to gather information on competitors or as part of a job search.

The James J. Hill Center’s reference library is a world-class research facility with an unparalleled collection of print materials and online databases dedicated to business and leadership.  Take research to a new level with free access to powerful business databases and resources. Entrepreneurs can generate lists of companies matching user-defined criteria and find thousands of full-text articles from business magazines, industry specific financial metrics, lists of grant-making foundations, consumer psychographics, and geographically-specific market data. If you are unable to find what you are looking for, call or email our Reference Specialist to schedule an appointment 651-265-5500.

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How to Have a Productive 2017

At the beginning of every year it’s important to think back and check off all you’ve achieved. Give yourself a pat on the back, be proud of all you’ve accomplished, and then, look ahead. What do you want to achieve in the coming year? What are the priorities to move you and your business forward? And most important, HOW are you going to do all of this? We’ve thought back to our year here at the Hill and came up with a list of tips and actions to help have the most productive year yet!

Create short-term AND long-term goals

When setting goals for yourself and your business, it’s important to cover all bases from overall organization goals and day-to-day priorities. The short term goals help create a feeling of productivity – plus it’s satisfying to cross items off the list. These goals keep you and your employees moving throughout the day and week and ensure the small, but important tasks are done. The long-term goals push the business in the right direction and dictate the clear action plan for the organization. They tie all the small decisions together and at the end of the year – or the time frame set – it is clear whether the goal is hit and the business is moving in the desired direction.

Multi-task, but only when necessary

Decide whether you want quality over quantity for each major project and enforce it. When an employee or employer is being pulled in too many directions, work suffers. Now, this isn’t to say you can’t have a to-do list with 4 top priority items all in the works at the same time. But when you’re working on one of those items, focus. For example, don’t send emails while you’re on a conference call, keep the amount of tabs low on your browser so you’re not tempted by other projects, don’t text while you’re in a meeting. Work on one thing at a time, and do it well.

Minimize digital distractions

In the office it can be especially hard to minimize digital distractions. Most people work on a computer for the majority of the day, and it’s easy to end up on social media or reading articles when you should be checking items off of that daunting to-do list. It is ok to take mental breaks, but don’t allow them every 10 minutes. If social media is vital to your work or professional life, pick a time to check and hold yourself to that time. This feels nearly impossible, but I promise it’s not. It just takes some self-control. If you have a busy week, take social media apps off your phone. It’s an easy way to minimize this time waster.

Write everything down

It may seem simple and obvious, but keep track of everything.  Write it down, make a note on your phone, send yourself an email, use post-it notes, whatever works for you. It’s easy to have a casual conversation and a great idea to come of it, and then forget because you get pulled into a scheduled meeting or an email distracts. Along the same idea, physically writing down what needs to get down will help organize and prioritize.  It’s also important to write out goals and track the progress. You’ll be able to see the actual progress being made in a tangible way, and hopefully this encourages you and your employees.

Productivity looks different to everyone, but setting goals and minimizing distractions are easy ways to keep you and your business on track for the best year yet.  In December Forbes published a list of actual tools to help with productivity in the workplace. Goals are not achieved alone; use the people around you and all tools at your disposal.

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Improvising Life: A Conversation with Shanan Custer


Shanan Custer is  a writer, actor, teaching artist, director as well as an improviser in the Twin Cities. Her original works includes: 2 Sugars, Room for Cream, (with Carolyn Pool) which won an Ivey Award for Best Ensemble in 2013;  Mick Sterling Presents: At Christmas  (with Jim Robinson); and From Here to Maternity (with Joshua Scrimshaw). Shanan has performed, directed and improvised all over the Twin Cities and can currently be seen performing in The Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society presented by the James J. Hill Center.

How did you begin your entrepreneurial artistic career?
Shortly after I went to graduate school and started working at the Brave New Workshop as an actor/writer I began to create my own work. It felt right–more right than anything I had ever done before.

What has been the largest hurdle and / or success you have experienced as an artist and entrepreneur?
My largest success would be that I am still creating and producing after all of the highs and lows. The largest hurdle would be anything that distracts me from writing, which includes but is not limited to Netflix, books and wine!

How do you manage being a creative entrepreneur and what advice would you give to other entrepreneurs?
One word: resilience. Nothing will ever be perfect, every project will require you to bend and flex and and there will always be people who want to change what you do–for good or worse, but it’s still a challenge. I’ve been told that my shows “don’t fit in a tidy box” and once had a producer tell me that “two women” onstage wasn’t going to sell tickets. I believed otherwise, so I knocked on the next door and the next. If you can keep moving forward in the midst of these kinds of challenges, then you are in the right place!

You do a ton of improvisation –  how did this come to be and how has it shaped your career?Improvisation changed my life. I was more classically trained as an actor and so I never experienced the form until I started working in theater professionally, but once I did it changed how I performed and wrote as well as how I approached my personal life. The first time I improvised was in an audition for the Brave New Workshop and the rest as they say is history. I love the form and the improv community in the Twin Cities is so vibrant and is growing so fast–it’s really exciting!

What is it about Minnesota and how has it managed to keep you here?
The Twin Cities has proven time and again to be a wonderfully supportive community for so many artists. I can have a life here outside of my work and still feel free to take risks artistically. The landscape of the cities changes enough to keep me invested and I feel like I am challenged to keep up. I also really, really love snow! Please don’t hold it against me.

Shanan Custer and a stellar Twin Cities cast will be performing in The Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society at the James J. Hill Center on Sunday, January 29 at 3:30 pm.  REGISTER NOW!

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The Vision to Help Everyone See the Big Picture

Leah Kodner, Library Specialist from the James J. Hill Center, interviews entrepreneurs and 1 Million Cup presenters Henry Amoloja of Murol. As seen in the Pioneer Press, Startup Showcase on January 14, 2016.

Have you ever taken a group selfie, shared it on Instagram, and found that some of the people got cut out of the frame? That’s what happens when you take a photo in landscape orientation and share it on sites like Instagram, where the photos are displayed in portrait orientation. Instead of seeing the entire photo, you only see the part of the photo that fits into a square, and anything (or anyone) appearing outside of that square is lost.

Having experienced this problem, Henry Amoloja set out to create a solution. That solution: MUROL, a landscape orientation photo-sharing app.

COMPANY PROFILE 

  • Name of company: MUROL
  • Website: www.murolapp.com
  • Business Start Date: April 2016
  • Number of Employees: 4 team members: Marketing Director Tamir Hussein, CTO Ben Fossen, Business Development Specialist Jeremiah Osopko, and Creative Director Elly Olson.
  • Number of Customers: Approaching 2,000 users

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

  • Name: Henry Amoloja
  • Age: 24
  • City you live in: Maplewood
  • Country of birth: Desenzano Del Garda, Italy
  • High School attended: Roseville Area High School
  • College attended: University of Minnesota Duluth

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. I was raised in Nigeria. My family immigrated to Minnesota in 2003 and I have lived here ever since. I took up football and track in high school. Playing sports taught me the value of hard work and the reward of the seeing the results. While at college at UMD, I took an interest in business courses like Intro to Marketing and Corporate Finance. I always knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur, I just had no idea what I was good at and what products or services I would selling.

I began cutting my own hair in college because I did not trust any barbers in Duluth to do a good job with my hair. I bought a clipper set and began experimenting with different hair styles on myself. Friends took notice and became coming to me for a free haircut. I eventually got good enough to start charging $5 and I saved up to buy professional clippers and started charging $10. This was a rewarding experience for me to monetize on a self-taught skill.

I had a short stint of selling custom sunglasses in college, as well. I knew I had an entrepreneurial bone in my body but I struggled to harness it to its full potential. I began reading business articles outside of school and becoming really fascinated by branding, marketing strategies, financial statements and other components of corporations.

A co-worker named Luida recommended a book to me called “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill that completely changed my life. I feel like it was exactly what I needed to fully maximize my entrepreneurial potential. I read other self-development and business books and planned to start a company when I graduated.

After college, I decided to attend a nine-month barbering program while working to support myself. When the program concluded I accepted a job at Ferguson Enterprises and was sent to North Carolina for a five-month training program. While in North Carolina, the concept behind MUROL was conceived. When I returned to Minnesota in January 2016, I worked hard on the branding and the first public announcement of what I had been working on. I added four people to the team to help with the overwhelming tasks. We launched in the app store on June 21, 2016. Held a beautiful launch event in August which brought us to 1,000 users about eight weeks later. In December of 2016, I decided to quit my sales job at Ferguson to focus on MUROL.

Q. What is your business?
A. MUROL is the first photo sharing app that allows users to capture, display and share photos on a strict landscape-oriented interface as opposed to a portrait-oriented interface.

READ FULL ARTICLE

 

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit jjhill.org/1-million cups

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St. Paul’s Got Talent: A Conversation with Eric Webster


Eric Webster has been performing on stage, camera and radio for over 25 years. As recipient of the 2010 “Best Actor in a Musical″ from Lavender Magazine he has graced such stages as the Guthrie Theater, Mixed Blood, Park Square, The Playwrights’ Center, Hennepin Stages and many more. His on camera success has ranged from his Emmy Nominated show “The Big Bad Movie” to the nationally broadcast DirectTV program “Big Events”. Eric can currently be seen performing in The Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society presented by the James J. Hill Center as well as in his original radio show Shades Brigade.

How did you begin your entrepreneurial career in the arts begin?
I started my career in sports broadcasting as a play-by-play, sports talk show host.  After spending 10 years in the field of sports radio – I walked away from it, realizing that I liked playing sports, but talking about them all day was not doing it for me.  I knew I liked the entertainment and creative aspect, so I tried my hand at all sorts of things like stand-up comedy and non-sports talk radio.  I eventually landed a gig as the Stadium Announcer for the St. Paul Saints Baseball Team.  There I was allowed to create anything I could imagine.  After 6 years at the Saints with free reign and  a “Go ahead and see if it works” environment I realized that I loved that creative freedom.  My first foray into theater was the long running “Tony and Tina’s Wedding,”  that allowed me to both act and create something new every night.

What has been the largest hurdle and success you have experienced as an artist and entrepreneur?
Largest hurdle?  Selling Tickets to shows you write and produce.
Biggest success? Being a self-employed full time actor for over 20 years.

Do you think being a creative entrepreneur is different from other entrepreneurial careers?
Trying to sell something to somebody is pretty much what everybody does at their job.  I’m selling the idea of “come see what I wrote and what I find interesting.” That’s a tricky sell.  It’s hard to guarantee anybody that they need what you’re selling.

What advice would you give to other entrepreneurs?
My advice is to anybody, in any field, is become good at a lot of things.  The more you can do the more options you have to create an opportunity.

You have an obsession with old time radio shows – how did this come to be?
When I was young my parents wouldn’t allow me to stay up to watch Johnny Carson.  So they bought me one of those radios that also get TV stations, so I could listen to Carson’s monologue and the comedians he had on while I was in bed.  It also had a tape deck so I could record all the monologues.  I had all these tapes of comedians from the Carson show.  Then I started listening to North Stars Hockey on the radio and the play-by-play man Al Shaver.  It was so amazing to me that he could paint that picture in my head.  I could see the players and all of the action just because of his words.  I was then introduced to some old-time radio shows on cassette that you could buy — the “Lone Ranger” and the “Shadow” and classics like that.  I loved how I was able to participate in the final piece.  It was up to me to decide how the room looked or a person looked or what they were wearing.  It was like a I was part of the creative process.  I was hooked forever on theater of the mind.  Years later, because of the internet, I didn’t have to scour and search for old-time radio shows – they were all there online.  Thousands and thousands of episodes. I love the internet.

What is it about Minnesota and how has it managed to keep you here?
I have lived all over from Boston to Los Angeles.  I came back here and I’m never leaving.  This is the best place on earth.  You have four seasons, two major cities, you can be in the middle of the woods in about an hour drive north, the quality of living is tops in almost every category, and there aren’t a lot of things that can kill you.  We have nothing really poisonous sneaking around in the grass waiting to bite you, no hurricanes or earthquakes.  Yes, tornadoes, but if you compare it to say, Florida, well there are so many things that can kill you in Florida.  Plus, again thanks to the internet, we no longer have to be in L.A. or New York to succeed as an actor.  You can audition here for national work and you can produce that work locally.  I can make a good living in my own backyard now.  And it’s not just for acting, almost every field is now able to function in any market.  YEAH INTERNET!!!

Eric Webster and a stellar Twin Cities cast will be performing in The Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society at the James J. Hill Center on Sunday, January 29 at 3:30 pm.  REGISTER NOW!

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Two Friends Create Buzz Around Cold-Brew Coffee

Leah Kodner, Library Specialist from the James J. Hill Center, interviews entrepreneurs and 1 Million Cup presenters, Alex French and Andrew Healey of Get Bizzy. As seen in the Pioneer Press, Startup Showcase on December 31, 2016

For a variety of reasons, ranging from a lack of sleep to being overscheduled and overworked, Americans are increasingly tired. A recent poll by YouGov shows that only 1 in 7 Americans report feeling well-rested every day. For the rest of us, there’s caffeine.

Whether from coffee, tea, energy drinks or pop, caffeine can provide us with the much-needed jolt of energy we need to get through the day. At the same time, many of the pre-packaged beverages on the market include added ingredients like sugar that add unnecessary calories to the jolt.

Due to hectic schedules and a need for increased energy, Alex French and Andrew Healey turned to cold-brew coffee. Cold brew coffee is increasingly trendy, but it’s time-consuming to make at home. They started Get Bizzy in response to this demand. Unlike many other pre-packaged beverages, Bizzy Coffee is sugar- and calorie-free, and because it’s pre-packaged, it doesn’t take hours for consumers to prepare.

COMPANY PROFILE 

  • Name of company: Get Bizzy, Inc.
  • Website: www.bizzycoffee.com
  • Business Start Date: May 2015
  • Number of Employees: 4 full-time
  • Number of Customers: Thousands

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

  • Name: Alex French
  • Age: 27
  • City you live in: New Brighton
  • Country of birth: St. Paul
  • High School attended: Irondale High School
  • College attended: University of St. Thomas
  • Name: Andrew Healey
  • Age: 28
  • City you live in: New Brighton
  • Country of birth: St. Paul
  • High School attended: Irondale High School
  • College attended: University of Minnesota

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. We are childhood friends who met while going to middle school in New Brighton. We stayed friends throughout high school and college. Alex went to the University of St. Thomas and Andrew went to the University of Minnesota. Alex majored in business and Andrew in mechanical engineering. After graduating, we were both hired at large corporations and felt unfulfilled with our jobs. Bizzy Coffee was founded while we were working our corporate jobs, training for World’s Toughest Mudder — a 24-hour obstacle race, and running a group fitness company that we had started several years previously. Juggling those three things was a challenge, and we needed a way to get more energy and stamina without resorting to unhealthy energy drinks. We discovered cold brew coffee at this time, and started working on a way to make it more convenient. In 2015, Bizzy Coffee was born.

Q. What is your business?
A. Bizzy Coffee is the No. 1-selling cold brew coffee on the internet. We manufacture a Certified Organic cold brew coffee concentrate that is sold in all 50 states and Canada…READ FULL ARTICLE

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit jjhill.org/1-million cups

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A New Years Resolution Everyone Should Consider


With a New Year on the horizon comes new resolutions and work life balance is often one that appears on many entrepreneurs lists but is often ignored or lost in the hustle and bustle to get things done. We understand starting, and even running, a business takes dedication, passion and time. No one becomes an entrepreneur for the convenient hours. So how do you maintain a work-life balance while running your own business? And is it even possible?

Here are 4 suggestions we believe help balance work and life, while still putting 110% into your career.

Set Priorities
The first step in creating the most efficient and lasting work-life balance is knowing your priorities. And utilize this in both personal and professional life. Only you can decide what works best for you and what comes first – and it’s ok to have work come first one day, and personal life the next!

Setting priorities at work will keep you and your staff efficient and productive. Time is crucial, especially in the early stages, and should not be wasted.

Delegate
When starting a new business it can be hard to not be in everything. Many entrepreneurs start out solo and try to get all the work done on their own. Fight the urge and delegate! Build a team you trust and spread out the work. The transition might not be easy, but it’s important. Let go of the fear that your business will fail if you are not working all the time, and on every piece of the business.

Find tools to simplify & save time
In today’s professional world, technology can be the best assistant. Use tools like phone & online calendars to sync everyone’s schedules – personally and professionally. It keeps everyone aware of time and priorities, and helps you track your time. Set up email reminders and use note apps to save time.  If you are a small team, or a team of one, social media tools like Hootsuite save hours of time. Use technology to your advantage to save you time & effort.

Schedule professional and personal life
Use calendars mentioned above to schedule both professional and personal life. It may seem strict & less personal to schedule out your life after work, but it helps support time management and priorities. Treat your dinners with friends or significant others as meetings – you can’t push them or skip them when work gets busy.

Balance looks different for everyone. And it can change over time. The balance you strike at the beginning will look different than the balance found once your business has been established. But it’s important to evaluate your time and where it’s being spent no matter what stage you and your business are at.  So take the time you need and put it on your to do list for 2017.

Happy New Year from the Hill! We look forward to seeing you in 2017.

 

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IMPORTANT NOTICE:

We are in the process of renovating the James J. Hill Center to make the space more accessible to individuals with wheelchairs or limited mobility. This construction includes major renovation of our interior elevator. Due to this renovation, elevator access to the building and second floor for persons with accessibility constraints will be limited. A manual mobility Liftkar operated by a trained JJ Hill staff person will be available so that individuals in wheelchairs have access to our space. To schedule assistance before your visit, or if you have questions, please contact 651.265.5500. Unfortunately we are unable to transport electric scooters. Elevator construction will begin October 31, 2016 until completion in April, 2017. We apologize for any inconvenience during this construction. Thank you for your understanding.

This project has been financed in part with funds provided by the State of Minnesota from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund through the Minnesota Historical Society and the F. R. Bigelow Foundation.

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