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Startup Showcase: They Left Corporate America to Carve Their Niche

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently we connected with presenters Garrett Faust and Harrison Blankenship. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on July 14, 2018. 

In a world where trade wars are taking focus artisans can offer a unique view of successful localized manufacturing. According to Brookings Institute’s 2017 report “Five ways the Maker Movement can help catalyze a manufacturing renaissance,” artisans may catapult the next “industrial revival:” “By embracing the do-it-yourself ethos of the maker movement, communities across the country can renew a sense of local community and help rebuild American manufacturing from the ground up.”

Garrett Faust and Harrison Blankenship of Uptown Woodworks are a perfect example of that very ideal. After discovering their need for personal creativity, they made a successful departure from corporate America to create customized wood art with a local flare. Their fusion of talent, skill and curiosity define the future of the “maker-nation” and is truly an example of entrepreneurial success.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Names: Garrett Faust, Harrison Blankenship
Ages: Garrett: 27; Harrison: 27
City you live in: Garrett: St. Louis Park; Harrison: Minneapolis (North Loop)
College attended: Garrett: University of St. Thomas; Harrison: Gustavus Adolphus College

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Uptown Woodworks
Website: www.uptownwoodworks.com
Instagram: @uptown.woodworks
Business Start Date: March 4, 2016
Number of Employees: 2
Number of Customers: as of June 4: 738

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?

A. Garrett: I spent most of my childhood playing sports and doing things outdoors. I was always curious about how things were built and worked, which is probably what led me to get an engineering degree from the University of St. Thomas. During my senior year at St. Thomas, I took some entrepreneurial electives and fell in love with it. Once I graduated, I felt compelled to at least give engineering a shot since I had just spent four years earning the degree. It was when I was working for Rockwell Automation in 2015-16 that I felt the need for a creative outlet, which led me to find Nordeast Makers, the maker space that is now home to Uptown Woodworks.

Harrison: I grew up in the Lake Minnetonka area and have always been obsessed with lake life and the outdoors. My father was what I like to call a renaissance man. He was an entrepreneur, pro race car driver, private pilot, lifelong maker, hunter, world traveler, etc. He and my mother really inspired me to have a lot of interests growing up, some of which include DIY projects, being outdoors, playing the drums and a lot of drawing/designing. For the last five years, I have been doing paid social strategy and more recently doing the strategy for major brands. Once I saw what Garrett was working on, that creative side of me re-awakened. My marketing and social media experience complimented Garrett’s expertise perfectly. Two years later, we’re still having fun.

Q. What is your business?
A. Uptown Woodworks creates custom and personalized wooden wall art for both consumers and businesses. We take requests for custom wooden wall art and work with customers to design their vision. After a proof is finalized, we create the wooden wall art out of our shop in Northeast Minneapolis using laser cutters, a CNC router, as well as other typical woodworking equipment.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. Over the past couple years we have developed a network of individuals and local businesses we can reach out to when we need advice. We think the most important thing is to get involved in the community. Attending events like 1 Million Cups, and other Meetups around town are a great way to make connections. It’s amazing how this small business community wants to help one another by sharing knowledge, resources, connections and opportunities.

Q. What is the origin of the business?

A. Around Christmas 2015, Garrett was looking for creative outlets outside of his day job and found Nordeast Makers in Northeast Minneapolis. With just a monthly fee, the maker’s space gave him access to heavy duty equipment including laser cutter/engravers, CNC routers, 3D printers, and other tools. With a mechanical engineering background, Garrett quickly learned how to use the equipment. Around the same time, he and Harrison moved into a new apartment in Uptown.  One of the first things Garrett created at the maker space was a four-foot Minneapolis skyline. When he brought it home, Harrison was blown away by it. This was a light bulb moment. Harrison immediately wanted to get involved in what Garrett had found/started. They saw the State Hockey Tournament was approaching so they impulsively purchased a booth and created different variations of two hockey/tournament related designs. As they created pieces and shared them on their social channels, people began to take interest and ask for custom pieces for themselves. This started to snowball and has since turned into a sustainable business….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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The Sunday Books Section

In the April 9, 1922 Sunday edition of the “Pioneer Press,” the Hill Library ran a piece titled “Great Works on Tropical Trees and Flowers Reach Hill Library.” Presumably penned by Hill staff, the short article explicates on new additions to the Hill collection, which included a seven-volume series called Flora of British India and the eight-volume Flora of Tropical Africa.

It continues:

Quite as interesting, elaborate and complete as the above are two series of books on two families of birds. That on the Turdidea or Thrush, by Seebohm, has been out several years. These two beautiful and luxurious volumes are illustrated by colored plates covering every branch of the Thrush family. … A later and still uncompleted work is ‘A Monograph of the Pheasants.’ … a rare work and one difficult of access.

The article ends noting that “the above are but a few selected items from the treasures of the Hill Reference Library, which the public is invited to consult.”

The Pioneer Press had already been running a Sunday books section, which featured new acquisitions at the public library and short reviews by library readers. In March 1922—just four months after we opened—the Hill Library joined this section on an irregular basis, announcing new additions to our shelves.

Studying these old copies of the Pioneer Press at the Gale Family Library at the Minnesota Historical Society, our staff has been able to get a glimpse into not just the titles the library used to own, but also their significance. While we have ledgers of book purchases from our early decades, these articles bring the books to life in a way a mere listing of the title and price cannot. And as the above passage makes clear, there was quite the variety of rare knowledge stored within these walls!

We no longer promote new books in the newspaper, but we do team up with the Pioneer Press to promote something just as special: entrepreneurs. Every other Sunday, we run the “Startup Showcase” column, which features a startup from our 1 Million Cups program. We couldn’t be prouder to carry on our history of sharing fresh ideas with the community in this latest iteration of our Sunday column.

 


Written by Ann Mayhew, Reference & Support Specialist, at the James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library our our historic collection at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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It All Adds Up: Saying Yes to the Unknown

If you’ve followed my monthly posts on the James J. Hill Center blog, you’ve probably noticed that I’m not your “typical” business blogger. Truthfully, when Lily Shaw, External Relations Director, approached me and asked if I was interested in being a contributor, I told her I wasn’t a business blogger. Yes, I absolutely love writing and yes, I am an entrepreneur. However, I had never combined the two, and just like that I was able to disqualify myself based on the unknown. Naturally, I followed up with my most polite, “thank you, but no thank you. Even though my response was a shaky “no”, I was secretly hoping that she would ignore the “no” that I verbalized and listen to the unspoken “yes” that I was silently screaming. Somehow she heard my silent “yes.”

Stepping into the unknown pretty much describes my entire business journey. From my earliest days at farmer’s markets when I was terrified to put my product on display— to many days spent at a vendor’s fair with my modestly decorated table right next to an elaborate booth represented by a nationally known company; I have continuously found myself in that difficult place of saying yes to the unknown. Spoiler alert…saying yes to the unknown has not always worked out in my favor, but I’ll save that for a separate blog post.

There are so many aspects of entrepreneurship that are rooted deeply within the unknown and I’ve just taken another leap. Later this month, I will be surrounded by friends, family, supporters and strangers to share the next chapter of my entrepreneurship journey. I am so excited, but I’m also terrified beyond belief. Daily I have to reassure myself “you’ve planned the work, now work the plan.” I have to remind myself that the dream is always bigger than the dreamer, so give yourself permission to keep growing. And when the thoughts of “what if this does not work” bombard my mind, I have to run to the nearest mirror, stare right back at myself and scream the reminder: “but what if it does work, my dear dreamer, what if it does work.”

As a mission-driven entrepreneur, the heart of my work comes from a very personal place, a very vulnerable place, filled with countless unknown details and life changing experiences. I’ve learned flexibility is a reoccurring appointment on my calendar and building a complementary team is one of the keys to success. I’ve learned that building my sales funnel is the foundation to generating revenue, and maintaining positive cash flow is the cause of my countless gray hairs.

With all of the hard facts and data filling my desktop and the unknown details that have left me “sleepless in the Twin Cities,” there is a force of hope that fuels my drive to keep dreaming, believing and doing. After all, I live by the well-known mantra: she believed she could, so she did!

So, I want to hear from you. What dream or goal have you been putting off because of the unknown details? What is one action that you can take today to get one step closer to achieving that goal? I’d love to here all about it. You can share the details with me by clicking here.

If you are up for a little celebration and the best cookies in town, I invite you to join me at my upcoming launch celebration. You can reserve your free ticket here. If you’d like to keep in touch and follow along on this hop-filled journey, you can like, follow or join me on Facebook and Instagram @junitasjar and on @JunitaLFlowers on Twitter.

 


You can read more about Junita Flowers on her website junitasjar.com. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

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Underutilized Research Gems

If your first thought when hearing the phrase “government information,” is a stack of boring, bureaucratic reports, you’re not alone. There’s more to government information, however, than you may realize. Several government agencies regularly produce valuable business intelligence and the James J. Hill Center can direct you to some underutilized gems.

If you’re exploring a new industry, the U.S. Census Bureau should be your first stop. The Census does far more than count people; it counts businesses as well! The Economic Census run every five years and collects data at the sector and industrial level along with information about business expenses and industrial growth. The 2017 Census is scheduled for release soon, so keep an eye on that space for the latest information.

Interested in gleaning public company data from the web? Check out the SEC’s EDGAR search tool. Located on the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission website, this tool allows users to pull certain mandated reports for public companies. These include annual reports (10-K), quarterly reports (10-Q), and special announcements (8-K) along with a variety of other documents. If you’re interested in getting the nitty-gritty information on publicly traded companies, using EDGAR can trim down your time spent searching company websites for glossy annual reports.

Want to learn more about government information and how it pertains to your business? Check out the Hill’s Research Boot Camp series. This accelerated class combines government and subscription database information for a 360-look at how business information is gathered and more importantly, how you can use it to succeed.

 


Written by Jessica Huffman, Business Outreach Librarian, at the James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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Startup Showcase: Entrepreneur Meets Restaurateur with New App

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently we connected with presenter Taranvir Johal. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on June 30, 2018. 

Talent defies age when it comes to entrepreneurship and 18 year old Taranvir Johal is proof of that. He already owns one company and has developed an app for another. With his eye on the game and his passion clear, Johal loves to “get his hands dirty.” With his new restaurant app Tavolo, he is jumping on the trend of transforming the restaurant experience.

In its first restaurant industry trends report, Skift Megatrends 2018, Skift Table says “restaurants are also looking to new technology to both enhance and — in some cases — define the in-restaurant dining experience … Touch-screen ordering, cashless transactions, and more personalization can make the experience more exciting for a guest.”

Johal has certainly taken a seat at the table and looked ahead at what restaurants need to be successful and his app Tovolo may just be the answer to fight the delivery boom.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Taranvir Johal
Age: 18
City of Birth: Queens, N.Y.
City you live in: Fargo, N.D.
High School Attended: Oak Grove Lutheran High School
College attended: University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Tavolo
Website: Tavoloapp.co
Twitter: @tavolo_app
Business Start Date: March 25, 2018
Number of Employees: 4

 

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. I am an 18-year-old aspiring entrepreneur that loves to get his hands dirty. I am from Fargo, N.D., and fell in love with entrepreneurship while I was in high school. During my sophomore year, I attended the Yale Young Global Scholars program and met numerous individuals who were pursuing their passions. They inspired me to learn more about what I wanted to do with my life. During my senior year, I participated in the Young Entrepreneurs Academy and launched my first company, Protein+. I just completed my freshman year at the Carlson School of Management and am extremely excited to see what the future has in store.

Q. What is your business?
A. Tavolo is an application that allows users to reserve a table, order, and pay at restaurants through their mobile devices. Moreover, Tavolo provides data to restaurants regarding how specific customers tip, server ratings and reviews, turn time per table, customer preferences, and customer profiles.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. We have created an advisory board with individuals who are more experienced and have more business knowledge than us. We selected these people over the course of two months and tried to incorporate individuals who we believed could help propel our company forward.

Q. What is the origin of the business?
A. Our company started during TechStars Startup Weekend. Abdi Hassan, a junior at the University of St. Thomas, pitched the idea to us and (we) loved it. We ended up winning 2nd place at the event and began meeting with numerous entrepreneurs around Minneapolis who loved our idea as well. This eventually led us to speak at 1 Million Cups Saint Paul.

Q. What problems does your business solve?
A. Our business minimizes the time wasted while dining out at restaurants. Tavolo gives users full control of their dining experience. With the click of a button a consumer can order their food, request for a waiter, and even pay for their meal.

Q. Where did you pivot in your company’s journey? What big obstacle or hurdle did you have to overcome?
A. We initially wanted to be an application that allows users to order and pay for their meals prior to arriving to the restaurant. We eventually realized that consumers enjoy adding more items to their meal while they are dining. We decided to pivot and allow users to pay for their meals once they we done dining. We also learned that consumers dislike waiting for their server to come to their table. Therefore, we pivoted by creating a feature on the app that allows users to call their waiter simply by tapping their phone screen….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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Angel Investors and Their Criteria for an Investment

For startups, financing can be challenging, and often the biggest barrier. Each month we’re focusing on a different financing option in Minnesota for startups and featuring experts in the field. 

It is important to first understand that angel investors and VCs all share one thing in common: the need for a return on their investment. This is not philanthropy. Even Impact Investors who may accept lower rates of return, still need that ROI.

After a founder understands this, one must realize that there are angel investors who specialize in an industry while others are “agnostic” meaning they are open to all industries.  Do your homework in advance of contacting investors.

What all investors rate highest in evaluating a deal is the strength of the team.

  • Does the management team have the relevant skills to be successful?
  • The team should bring diverse skill sets to the business.
  • After funding, who would be the first hires to help round out the team?
  • If not the management team, are there mentors or an advisory board to help guide the management team.
  • The gold star is a founder or early team member that has been through the business stages from concept to an exit.
  • Many investors like to see some “skin in the game”. Have the founders invested in their own startup?
  • Passion for their concept
  • Are the founders coachable? Will they listen to others and sift through their advice for better ways to build the company?

A great team can carry a good concept to success. A dysfunctional team can kill the best business models.

Back to the ROI…

Is there an exit in the plan? The business can be very successful but without an exit there is generally no ROI. Ideally, investors would like to see an exit (acquisition or an IPO for example) in 5 to 7 years. There are other ways to structure an exit. This could be a form of revenue sharing or a guaranteed founder buy out of the investors.

 

David Russick is an established entrepreneur and angel investor. Russick is co-founder, Managing Director, and Board Member of Gopher Angels.  Russick was also founder and CEO of TUBS, Inc., a family owned waste and recycling business operating in the Twin Cities, Denver and Cleveland.   In addition, Russick serves on the Board of Advisors for the Dakota Venture Group.  Russick has been featured in the “Star Tribune,” “Twin Cities Business,” and the “Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal.” “Twin Cities Business” named him a “2014 People to Know – Finance.”  

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A Consumer’s Guide to Women’s Equity

Check back each month for the Original Thinker Series as we explore local innovation in entrepreneurship, the arts, and our community one pioneering mind at a time.

It is hard not to be optimistic after a conversation with Kateri Ruiz, founder of MAIA.community. Kateri is committed to emboldening women’s equity and has vowed that she “will not cease until all data sets can prove it.” Her approach to gender equity work: speak passionately and carry a big directory.

MAIA is a free access directory of women-owned businesses across the nation. It is built for the conscious consumer who wants to spend their money in alignment with their values—especially when it comes to gender equity. Companies with at least 50% or greater female representation in the highest levels of leadership are listed for free with the option to purchase a premium listing for greater visibility.

The idea for MAIA began when Kateri and her husband started paying attention to the products and services they were bringing into their home. They put them through a litmus test: were these products and services ideated by, created by, or done in a holistic image of a woman? After failing month after month to match their spending with the 5:1 female to male ratio of their household, Kateri realized there was a larger problem to solve. “Why is this so hard,” says Kateri. “Women owned firms are everywhere.”

Kateri began earnestly gathering every list of women-owned businesses she could get her hands on. (Shameless plug: She did some of her research at the James J. Hill Center.) What she realized in the process was that these lists are plentiful but scattered. They are often owned by groups or associations and accessible only to paying members. Additionally, most are designed for business-to-business use and not for the consumer.

Someone needed to gather all these lists into one place and make them searchable and user-friendly to the everyday person trying to live a socially conscious life. Thus MAIA was born. “We wanted to make it easier for consumers to have that level of information,” says Kateri. “So that consumers could spend their money in a way that meant something to them.”

Women make up nearly half of the workforce in the United States (46.9%). Yet, only 5% of S&P 500 companies have a female CEO and only 21.2% of board seats in these same companies are filled by women. “The disparity between who is doing the work and who is leading the companies we find to be a systemic barrier,” says Kateri.

After spending a career in workforce solutions, Kateri is taking the reverse approach with MAIA to influence systemic change. “If we are being told that we cannot figure out how to solve gender pay parity for another 50 years… then perhaps we should move outside of that status quo and drive a more female-centric economy—potentially on its own,” says Kateri. This is what makes Kateri an original thinker. She is harnessing the free information philosophy of the Internet to allow us to support the businesses—and the women leading them—that we’d like to see more of in the world.

“We believe that when women are involved equally at the highest levels of leadership where we ideate, where we create, where we are making the decisions… that can yield a more holistic product and solution,” says Kateri.

To join the MAIA Community visit their website maia.community or reach out to the team at info@maia.community.

 


Written by Christopher Christenson, Program & Event Coordinator, at the James J. Hill Center. Have an idea of a person or organization to feature in this series? Send your recommendations to 
christopher@jjhill.org.

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Startup Showcase: Job Matchmakers

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press. Recently we connected with presenters Nathan and Alex Guggenberger. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on June 17, 2018.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 9.8 million jobs are projected to be created by 2024 and, according to employee-screening services company EBI, 75 percent of that workforce will be made up of millennials.

Alex and Nathan Guggenberger have been a part of those job seeking statistics and ultimately decided to help themselves by helping others find the best fit. With 42 percent of people searching through job boards but only 14.9 percent of hires happening from those boards, Alex and Nathan thought they saw an opportunity to make job searching more efficient, holistic and ultimately give back to companies with a higher retention rate. Thus the birth of Jobiki — helping job seekers explore, discover and find meaningful work.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Nathan and Alex Guggenberger
City you live in: Minnetonka
City of Birth: Minnetonka
High School Attended: Hopkins High School
College attended: Augustana University

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Jobiki
Website: www.jobiki.com|
witter: @jobikiHQ
Business Start Date: Sept. 2, 2017
Number of Employees: 2
Number of Customers: 12

Q. What led to this point?

A. Nathan and Alex grew up together. Why? Because we are siblings. I guess you could say we have always worked together. We actually “tried” to start a business when we were in elementary school. It was called “A.B.C. Gum.” We wanted to make a brand new gum that looked like it had already been chewed. We closed up shop after the R&D (research and development) phase because the gum came out rock hard. In all seriousness though, we have always been a duo that bounced ideas off each other. With me (Alex) having a degree in business and accounting, and Nathan having a background in software development, it just made sense.

Q. What is your business?

A. We help people find meaningful work by finding a meaningful workplace. For many, including ourselves, nothing is more daunting then searching for employment. You often don’t know where to start or even what opportunities are out there. The solution for many is to apply to as many jobs as possible, hoping that they will eventually hear back from someone.

At Jobiki, we do things a little bit differently. The Jobiki job search starts with finding the right company. Our platform allows job seekers to explore company cultures through photos, videos, benefits, amenities, and neighborhood data of companies near them. Using the Jobiki filters, job seekers can discover the perfect company that fits with their lifestyle and personal brand. With Jobiki we allow you to signal interest in a company with a simple click of a button. After explaining why you want to work for that company, Jobiki will send your information and résumé to our contact with that company.  READ FULL ARTICLE…

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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It’s Tough to Stump a Librarian

The Hill Center has a rich archival history of our early years, including original book receipts from 1918, annual reports beginning in 1917, and even reference correspondence from as early as 1921.

The reference correspondence, which includes written requests for information and specific books, demonstrates both what people were researching here ninety years ago and what truly remarkable information finders librarians are!

One of the most fun discoveries was the numerous requests for the identity of a poem—usually with the patron providing only little or incorrect information.

In 1930, someone wrote in to the Hill asking, “Would you be kind enough to advise from what the following quotation was taken. ‘None knew him but to honor him; / None named him but to praise.’” Our diligent librarians discovered this to be the beginning of “On the Death of Joseph Rodman Drake, September 1820,” a poem by Fitz Green Halleck. 

How did they do it? While we can never say for sure since the processes for particular reference questions weren’t written down, we can assume it was how most research was done those days: mainly a matter of immense knowledge and familiarity with the subject and the library catalog. It’s possible we had a librarian who specialized in literature or, if not, outsourced the question to an outside librarian or expert. 

The editor of “The Daily Argus-Leader” in Sioux Falls, SD, was a particularly curious man. He once quipped in a letter to the Hill that, “I begin to feel there ought to be fees charged for my inquiries.” He often needed help identifying poems. In 1929, he wrote in: 

Have you anything in your anthologies whereby you could give authorship and “location” of old poem about the goat that used a shirt off the clothes line to flag a train? 

It thus begins: 

There was a goat—a one-eyed goat— 

And he was old enough to vote etc. 

Our librarians performed beautifully, promptly sending off the following response: 

The version which I found of the poem of a goat that flagged a train reads as follows: 

A HARLEM GOAT 

A Harlem goat was feeling fine,
Ate nine red shirts off Sallie’s line
Sal grabbed a stick, gave the goat a whack
And tied him to the railroad track.
A fast express was drawing nigh,
The Harlem goat was doomed to die
But with an awful shriek of pain
The Harlem goat coughed up those shirts and flagged the train.  

(Our research department today enjoyed learning more about Harlem goats here and here, even though the latter features a different version of the poem.)

But even the Hill librarians got stumped time to time. Our prolific friend in Sioux Falls wrote in, in 1928: 

“An inquiry comes to this office about a poem the burden of which is the following. There is a steep hill and a road runs down the land below. There is a number of accidents happening there and an ambulance is stationed at the foot of the hill to gather up the wounded. Some one [sic] suggests that a railing be placed on the side of the road going down hill [sic], but some one [sic] also says it is not necessary since there is an ambulance at the foot to receiving the injured. Did you ever hear about this?” 

Unfortunately, our librarians had not heard about this, even after scouring our poetry anthologies. 

Today it’s (usually!) easy to identify a poem or song from misremembered lines by typing them into Google, but for topics such as private company information, consumer behavior, and five-year industry forecasts, it’s still best to consult the experts. For your tough business questions, come in to check out our free specialized business databases, or connect one-on-one with a business research specialist through a Hill membership or premium research services. 

 


Written by Ann Mayhew, Reference & Support Specialist, at the James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library our our historic collection at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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It All Adds Up: Celebrating Growth

When I think about pivotal growth seasons in my life, one of the most memorable, but often scary experiences was becoming a parent. If you’re anything like me and began your parenting journey in the early 2000’s, then you probably owned and/or read one of the books from the series, “What to Expect…”. In spite of the millions of parents before me and the countless times I read and reread from the book series, my growth process of becoming a parent was unique to me. The same is true in the growth process as an entrepreneur and business owner. In spite of the case studies and research published by thousands of entrepreneurs, starting a business is extremely difficult and choosing to remain in business and experience growth is excruciatingly painful. But just like parenting, entrepreneurship adds immeasurable value to my lived experiences.

Over the last 1-1/2 years, I’ve been working with Minneapolis based brand consultants, Neka Creative, to redefine everything about my cookie company. While we’ve just reached the final stages in the planning and development process with a new name and logo, clearly defined messaging and a robust sales and marketing strategy, all of this preparation leads to another pivotal and scary growth process for me. However, just like my anticipation of becoming a new parent, I celebrate the possibilities first, followed by confidently leaning into the very common, yet extremely personal growth process.

The commonalities of the business growth process can be found in the business plan. The personalization of the business growth process is shaped by the life that is breathed into making the business plan a reality. Today, as I anticipate the new life I will infuse into my cookie company I am filled with an abundance of hope. Hope that something as simple as a cookie made from my favorite childhood recipes can be the force behind a movement of a safer, kinder, sweeter world by spreading a message that #HopeMunchesOn!

While the process is very personal, it is never experienced in isolation. As I take another step on my entrepreneurial journey, I’m inviting you to join me. I hope you will join me as I celebrate the re-branding and launch of my life’s work, Junita’s Jar. Stop over and visit the new website, junitasjar.com and stay tuned for more details on our July 31st launch party, which be held at the James J. Hill Center.

Entrepreneurship, just like parenting has been an extremely rewarding gift that has strengthened my character, defined my resilience and influenced my compassion for humanity. And similar to my hopes and dreams as a parent, I am committed to leading a cookie company that inspires good and spreads hope.

I’d love to hear from you. In anticipation of the upcoming launch party, I am looking for stories that reflect a message of #hopemuncheson. If you’d like to share your story, click here to request more information.

 


You can read more about Junita Flowers on her website junitasjar.com. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

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IMPORTANT NOTICE:

Patrons with accessibility needs please access our ground floor elevator entrance via Kellogg Ave at the back of the building. Please ring the doorbell on the right hand side of door and a Hill staff member will assist you. If you have questions or concerns please call 651.265.5500. We look forward to having you visit.

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