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James J. Hill Center Statement Regarding Current Closure

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Taking on Childhood Diabetes

St. Thomas Freshman takes it on!

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Leah Kodner, Library Specialist from the James J. Hill Center, interviews Entrepreneur and 1 Million Cup presenter, Meghan Sharkus with ExpressionMed.  As seen in the Pioneer Press, October 8, 2016

EXPRESSIONMED

  • Website: www.expression-med.com
  • Business Start Date: June 26, 2016
  • Number of Employees: 1
  • Number of Customers: We are in the beta testing stage, on the verge of a 90-day trial

MEGHAN SHARKUS

  • Age: 18
  • City you live in: St. Paul
  • City of birth: Fort Atkinson, Wis.
  • High school attended: Oregon High School, Oregon, Wis.
  • College attended: University of St. Thomas

Having a chronic illness like diabetes is frightening and overwhelming for children, and wearing an insulin pump can make them feel self-conscious. In response to this, Meghan Sharkus created ExpressionMed, a company whose adhesive product makes insulin pumps easier to use and comes in fun patterns and designs, so kids will feel more confident wearing them.

Q. What led to this point?

I am a creative, driven college freshman looking to make a difference. When I was younger, I went to Camp Invention, and it made me realize how much I enjoyed making things. Throughout high school, I explored my creativity through art and choreography, and eventually business. I served for one year as Wisconsin DECA  previously known as Delta Epsilon Chi and Distributive Education Clubs of America) vice president of community service and placed nationally for both my business plan and my advocacy campaign for the epileptic cause. Towards the end of high school, I really found out what I wanted to do READ MORE…

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.JJHill.org/go/1MCSPL.

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The Power of Diversity in Economy

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In 2012 Bruce P. Corrie, PhD and Samuel Myers, J. PhD worked together to survey various organizations across our state to uncover preliminary data and analysis on Minority owned businesses in Minnesota.

The data had very positive discoveries for many of the surveyed minority organization, showing significant growth and economic stability from 2007 to 2012. You would think that these discoveries would have been used as positive reinforcement for the continued growth and empowerment of minorities and their contributions to our communities in Minnesota.  However, over the past four years the challenges have continued to be an uphill battle and the positive growth has barely escalated.

In a recent article in MINNPOST it stated that the number of minority entrepreneurs in Minnesota are significantly below average. Minorities currently represent 22% of the metro population and look to increase another 20% by 2020, but currently only represent 7% of all employer firms. This is significantly lower than other cities with similar populations.  What is standing in our way and why are we unable to leverage the amazing diverse talents that surround us?

“We are our own greatest agents of change. We must remove barriers and create visibility and continuously shine a spotlight on the economic value, job creation, and importance of minority owned business in Minnesota,” said Pamela Standing, Executive Director, Minnesota Indian Business Alliance.

Diversification, inclusion and the breaking down of preexisting barriers are the pillars of a thriving and empowered economy that we need to support our communities of color in Minnesota. This transparency of thought and openness will make our community grow, prosper and become a powerful arena of economic empowerment.  We can no longer stand behind or fear what we do not know.  Building together and supporting one another is the only way for prosperity and growth.

With organizations like MEDA, Kaufman Foundation, SCORE, Pollen and other initiatives led by individuals and our local Government like DEED and CERT we hope that more significant changes of support and reinforcement can happen. It takes one relationship at a time to build a business – it takes a community to build an inclusive and prosperous economy.  We need to start now to make ours stronger.

Join us at the James J. Hill Center on October 27th at 8AM as we continue the conversation on Minority Business Enterprise Inclusion: Empowering Minnesota’s Economy. Guest panelists will include Dr. Bruce Corrie, Gary Cunningham and Karen Francois.

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The Hill Reference Round-Up

Blue Prints to Business Plans…
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September at the Hill was buzzing with visitors from students to entrepreneurs researching blue prints to business plans.  It is a prefect example of the vast amount of resources our Reference Specialists have at their fingertips.

Here are some examples of who, what and why people visited us! 

  • Over 110 researchers welcomed in September.
  • Most researchers were from Minnesota, and a few traveled from Wisconsin.
  • Several researchers this month came to use our resources to help them develop their business plans.
  • The majority of our visitors in September self-identify as entrepreneurs.
  • A student from the U of M studying architecture viewed historic building blueprints for a course project.
  • One researcher explored sales data and patent information related to exercise equipment.
  • We often welcome job seekers, but had one unique researcher this month, who works to support individuals with severe mental illness and conducted job searches on behalf of those individuals to locate potential workplaces near their homes to accommodate transportation limitations.

We look forward to seeing you at the Hill.  Contact a Reference Specialist today!

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The Hill Entrepreneurial Profile

Blaine business matches college students’ skills, business’ project needs

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Leah Kodner, Library Specialist from the James J. Hill Center, interviews Entrepreneur and 1 Million Cup presenter, Amanda Carlson on her Company Rookiework.

As seen in the Pioneer Press, September 25, 2016
Small businesses by definition have very few employees, sometimes not enough to perform all the tasks that need performing. These businesses also can lack the funds to hire consultants to perform these tasks.
College students, on the other hand, have valuable skills but not enough experience on their résumés to be hired for jobs that use those skills. Amanda Carlson and Thomas Storfjord created Rookiework to solve both problems, connecting the talented (and inexpensive) students seeking experience with the small businesses in need of help.

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Rookiework
Location: Blaine
Website: www.rookiework.com
Business Start Date: February 2016
Number of Employees: Two partners, Amanda Carlson and Thomas Storfjord
Number of Customers: Approximately 75

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Amanda Carlson
Age: 27
City you live in: Blaine
City of birth: Rochester
High school attended: Eveleth-Gilbert High School in Eveleth, Minn.
College attended: Hibbing Community College in Hibbing, Minn.

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?

A. I am originally a small town girl from the Iron Range in northern Minnesota. I have always enjoyed helping others and that passion flourished within the business world. I learned that I could help others while working at our two family businesses up north. After several career changes and moving to the Twin Cities with my husband, I became the business developer for Rookiework. READ MORE

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The Great Northern

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Last Friday we wrapped up Twin Cities Start Up Week in Minnesota.  It was truly inspirational to see all the interest and support for the empowerment of our economic ecosystem.  We decided it was important to give a nod to our entrepreneurial legacy, James J. Hill.

Entrepreneurs have been around since the start of time.  Think about it, at some point someone got sick of eating raw meat and thought, “I wonder what would happen if I rubbed two sticks together,” and poof – there was fire.  It probably wasn’t as simple as that but it is important to realize that these visionaries change our culture and economy.  People who have a dream, a passion and the motivation to stick it out can change history.  That is exactly what Mr. Hill did in the 19th century with his realization of the Great Northern Railway.

This railway was the only privately funded and successfully constructed transcontinental railroad in the history of the United States. Running from Saint Paul, Minnesota to Seattle, Washington it was the dream and passion of James J. Hill that made it happen.  His savvy business sense, smart partnerships, and innovative ways of engaging the public gave him the title of Empire Builder.  He used one of the first public relation campaigns to create interest and support in the railroad. Using contests to incentives he engaged the public on how the future of the railroad would not only shape their economic prosperity but changed the method of how people traveled. His vision put St. Paul, Minnesota on the map.

The Great Northern Railway is only one of the many amazing contributions that Mr. Hill gave to his community and our country. The James J. Hill Center is another perfect example of his forward thinking ability. His idea to build a location that was a meeting place of resource and learning is still celebrated today.

On November 11, 2016 we will once again be tipping our hats and toasting our legacy at our annual Great Northern Evening.  Join us to celebrate the legacy of Mr. James J. Hill and to support the economic empowerment of our local entrepreneurs.  Be a part of the Legacy and JOIN US on November 11th from 7pm to 10pm!

A Great Northern Evening – Tickets on Sale Now

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To the Dreamers…

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“Great things never come from comfort zones”

Next week is Twin Cities Startup Week a celebration of the “startup capital of the north,” Minnesota. A great time to recognize innovation, creative thinking and economic empowerment.  After reviewing some of the startups that have presented at 1 Million Cups St. Paul (every Wednesday 9AM at the Hill) we were impressed by the variety of individuals who made up these organizations, and the creative implementation of each idea.

We started to wonder what characteristic these entrepreneurs possess…these ground breakers, these innovators.  We were surprised to find it was not the usual traits that often define a successful business person (i.e. professional, competitive, ambitious).  The traits instead were holistic, passionate and creative – not typically the words used in day-to-day corporate environments.

Entrepreneurs are described as the artists of business, the breakers of the mold and the dreamers of our time. They come in all shapes, sizes, ages and races.  Their services and products vary from small to large, specific to broad, for niche groups or the entire world.  They are for profit and not for profit (some profitable, some just surviving).  But all of them have one thing in common.  They all start as a dream.

These risk takers go beyond their comfort zone and strive to create a new world.  They are the inspiration behind new ideas and revolutions that shape our daily decisions and define our economic future.

After reading about these innovators of change, we wanted to thank them for their willingness to jump, to believe in an idea, to keep an open mind, flexible heart, a passionate belief AND the confidence to persevere when it doesn’t work the first time.  We all can learn from them.  We all can be a little more entrepreneurial every day.

“If it is still in your mind, it is worth taking the risk”
– Paulo Coelho, lyricist & Novelist-

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There Are No Stupid Questions!

Many sticky notes with questions like who, what, when, where, how and why, and a question mark, all posted on an office noteboard to represent confusion in communincation

You can imagine the vast array of questions a resource library gets asked in one day.  In my brief time sitting at the JJ Hill Centers front desk on a Wednesday afternoon I was asked, “Can I look up every address I ever lived at?” and “Do you have a book that would show me where to find all the award emblems that can be given to student in school?” Our reference librarians can almost always find an answer and if not, they can point you in the right direction.  We are a business reference library and we cover every business imaginable, which leaves us with a vast database of facts and details that people quickly discover can connect them to more information than they may have thought.

But, is there ever a question that is too off the chart to answer?  In short, no. In December 2014 the Gothamist reported on a discovery found at the New York City Library.  A reference librarian was cleaning house and found a large box of old reference questions from the 1940s and 50s.  Questions varied from “What is a life span of an eyelash?” to “What percentage of bathtubs in the world are in the US?” to “Where can I rent a beagle for hunting?” Amazingly enough the system back then was the same as today and a reference librarian called them back with an answer.  There were of course question where answers could not be found, but the fact that people asked gives a wonderful nod to the trusted resource a reference library held then and still does today.

Here at the Hill we believe there are no stupid questions.  So, if you can’t find it when you search online and you want to dig deeper, contact us.  As the esteemed and highly respected Carl Sagan once said “There are naive questions, tedious questions, ill-phrased questions, questions put after inadequate self-criticism. But every questions is a cry to understand the world.” Come learn with us!

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What did people do before Google?

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The first patent filed under the name “Google, Inc.,” was on August 31, 1999 – 17 years ago.  It was initially started as a research project for “watermarking systems and methodology for digital multimedia content.”  It has since become the primary tool for all things people question, wonder and need to know,   BUT what did we do before Google and is there a human need to reconnect, be certain and have a trusted “human “source?

The James J. Hill Center is considered the oldest free reference library in the nation and still holds some of the most relevant business research in the country. Reference desks did not become a service until the late 1800’s.  The Boston Public Library in 1883 was the first library to hire librarians whose primary purpose was reference and research.  Over this century reference services grew to be a trusted direct personal assistant to readers seeking information. The invention of the computer, web and Google has drastically shifted that perspective but not eliminated it.  As more time is spent in front of our computers and listening to automated voicemail there has been another shift.

A recent article on the New York Public Library (NYPL) proves reference desks are still a vital and growing way to find out anything from the odd and mysterious to the most challenging. The NYPL receives 300 inquiries per day and one of the number one comments is “Thank God I’ve reached a human being.” At the Hill though the numbers are smaller, the reaction is the same.  Business researchers have access to databases and materials that are not easily accessible.  This is not to say that reference librarians do not use the web to search for answers but they are experts at sifting through content, picking what is relevant and getting a trusted response, backed up with facts and put in one place.

So the next time you jump on Google and type in “Business Plan Templates” – why not consider coming to the Hill to ask an expert or research some of the most successful businessmen in history figured out.  Reference libraries hold the backbone to our past and are the seed for our future.

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The Hill Team

The Hill known for connecting business, entrepreneurs, and community welcomes Danika LeMay, Lily Shaw and Maggie Smith to round off the team that will drive the mission and build the brand.

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The James J. Hill Center is pleased to announce the addition of three new members of the Hill team that will support Executive Director Tamara Prato.  The existing staff has been joined by (pictured left to right) Danika LaMay, Director of Reference Services; Lily Shaw, Director of Marketing; and Maggie Smith, Community Engagement Specialist.

“With the support of this incredible team I will have the ability to execute my vision to provide the community with unique entrepreneurial programming, cultural experiences and access to a dynamic Reference Library, which in turn will support the growth and economic development of the region” states Tamara Prato.

Danika LaMay most recently worked as Course Reserve Coordinator at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Libraries, where she helped instructors make course materials easily accessible to their students and had the opportunity to collaborate on innovative cross-unit and cross-campus projects. Danika is excited to bring her dedication to the user experience and make a positive difference.

Lily Shaw joins the team from Twin Cities Diversity in Practice where she oversaw the communications and programming of high quality diversity and inclusion initiatives for leading Twin Cities Legal Employers.  Lily is excited to collaborate with her team and promote invaluable and unique opportunities for the community.

Maggie Smith spent the past 3 years working as the marketing and communications manager for the local health non-profit Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota.  As the community engagement specialist for the James J. Hill Center, she is excited to work with the community to spread the word and advance the mission of the organization.

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About the James J. Hill Center – Opened in 1921, the James J. Hill Center supports the legacy of one of America’s greatest entrepreneurs. Today, the Hill is focused on supporting business, entrepreneurship, and community with the goal to build sustainable and lasting relationships that enable economic prosperity by providing services, programming, and cultural events. Learn more at jjhill.org or find us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

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Startup Showcase: OurOldNumber.com

Do you still remember your old home number, the one you had before cellphones became commonplace? Maybe you’re still using it for your landline because you know that number by heart and so do your friends, your family, your doctors, and everyone in your network.

Despite our reliance on cellphones, many people also keep their home numbers because it’s simpler to have that one household numbers for years. Jeff Swenson’s solution to that is called OurOldNumber.com.

OurOldNumber forwards calls to your home number to the cellphones of your household members, allowing the caller to choose which person they’d like to speak to. It even lets multiple conversations occur on that line simultaneously.

  • Name of company: Our Old Group, LLC dba OurOldNumber.com
  • Website: Ouroldnumber.com
  • Business Start Date: Dec. 30, 2014
  • Number of Employees: 1
  • Number of Customers: Dozens

Read the full article!

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IMPORTANT NOTICE:

Patrons with accessibility needs please access our ground floor elevator entrance via Kellogg Ave at the back of the building. Please ring the doorbell on the right hand side of door and a Hill staff member will assist you. If you have questions or concerns please call 651.265.5500. We look forward to having you visit.

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