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Startup Showcase: Food for Thought in Helping the State’s Business Growth

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently we connected with presenter Lauren Mehler Pradhan. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on September 8, 2018. 

According to the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, “Minnesota leads the nation in food patents per capita and has long been on the forefront of research and innovation in agriculture, food production and food safety.” In addition, Minnesota ranks among the top 10 in more than 20 agricultural products and is home to some of the nation’s largest agricultural and food production companies.

To accelerate this growth and build an interconnected ecosystem of support, The Holmes Center for Entrepreneurship at the Carlson School of Business established “Grow North.” Since launching in January of 2017 the organization has already made its mark in the community and with Lauren Mehler Pradhan at the helm, sharing stories of success and lending support, the ongoing growth in the North is inevitable.

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Grow North
Website: www.grownorthmn.com
Twitter: @grownorthmn
Business start date: January 2017
Number of employees: Me and two amazing interns
Number of customers: Sometimes too many to count.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Lauren Mehler Pradhan
Age: 36
City you live in: Hopkins
City of birth: New Brunswick, N.J.
High school attended: South Brunswick High School
College attended: Rutgers College

Q&A

Q. Who are you and what is your history?
A. I am the founding managing director for Grow North, a mom, a lover of food and deep believer in the impact that entrepreneurs and innovators can have on our food system. While I am originally from New Jersey, I am very proud to call Minnesota home for the last 14 years.

Q. What is your business?
A. Grow North is an initiative of the Holmes Center for Entrepreneurship at the Carlson School of Business focused on accelerating Minnesota’s ecosystem for entrepreneurship and innovation in food and agriculture. We offer education, mentorship, and networking programming as well as create large events like Food, Ag, Ideas Week Oct 8-12.

Q. What is the genesis of the business?
A. Grow North was inspired by a cross-section of the community coming together through the MN Cup, a venture competition out of the Carlson School, and their Food, Ag, Beverage division. The division quickly became the fastest growing division in the Cup. Community leaders started asking how they could extend support and connectivity to the community throughout the year, and so the idea of Grow North as an ecosystem builder, resource hub and connector came to life.

Q. What problems does your business solve?
A. We believe that startup businesses will grow and scale faster and smarter if they are a part of an interconnected, supportive, sophisticated ecosystem. To make this happen, we focus on solving the problem of connectivity — to resources, individuals and organizations. If we can help entrepreneurs and organizations get the right connection at the right time, they will spend more time growing their business — fewer clicks, fewer coffees, more growth. We also want Minnesota’s community to be connected and visible across the globe, and so I spend time connecting with leaders in other cities to drive awareness and bring best practices back.

Q. What personal strengths or skill sets do you bring to the business?
A. Minnesota has so much here to be proud of, but for some reason we do not like to talk about it. I bring a little bit of east coast straight forwardness to my work and so I happily share stories about the remarkable individuals and companies that are here to anyone who will listen. I spent 12 years at General Mills before Grow North, so I bring industry experience, connectivity and an appreciation for the complexities of our food system.

Q. Where do you go when you need help?
A. I feel very fortunate that I have found mentors in the community who have acted as sounding boards, advisers, as well as shoulders to cry on. I meet with two entrepreneurs a week not only to provide support but also to keep me honest that Grow North programming remains relevant. My interns and colleagues at the Holmes Center are great and we brainstorm ideas all of the time….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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It All Adds Up: Fall Forward – Embracing Changing and Preparing for Growth

It’s that time of year when everyone senses the reality that change is in the air. The weather shifts to crisp and cool days, the relaxation from the warmth of summer shifts to an urgency of seizing the daylight and the landscape of nature celebrates the beauty of change with richness, depth and beauty.

Fall is a natural season of change and for me, it represents new beginnings. Personally, it’s the start of a new school year and a shift in the daily at-home routine with my family. In my business, it’s a time for me to assess business outcomes and productivity and make necessary changes to ensure a strong finish by year end. However, learning to celebrate and grow from the natural progression of change required a mindset shift and forming new habits.

I’ve always operated at two speeds…fast and asleep. There wasn’t anything in between. I walked fast. I talked fast. I drove fast. I was always on the go. While the constant activity created a track record of getting things done, it also came with many missteps, fatigue and avoidable mistakes.

I continued at that fast pace because I thought it was necessary in order to make up for my perception of “lost time”. When the mistakes happened, I just picked up the pace and tried to accomplish more, instead of slowing down to process the mistakes, make necessary changes and celebrate the wins. This practice of always being on the go at a high speed was robbing me of my opportunity to be most effective, to enjoy progress and to learn from missteps. The high speed of constant movement created increased levels of anxiety and I was on the path toward self sabotage. Something clearly needed to change.

As solo-preneurs and small business owners, it can be so easy to fall into the trap of working IN your business and saving little time for working ON your business. While this pattern of constant movement can produce results of getting things done, it also can stagnate growth and create burnout.

It is so important to incorporate external learning communities and opportunities for growth as leaders and decision makers. I have found it to be both scary and liberating to step outside of my high speed of busyness in exchange for the thoughtful work of slowing down to increase my growth capacity. Slowing down brings me face to face with the things I have mastered, but also the areas in which I need to grow or completely outsource. Slowing down to reflect, plan and proceed takes time but can yield powerful results.

I am naturally wired for constant movement at high speeds, but I am most effective when I build in the benefits of a slower pace. For me, slowing down will always be a work-in-process. As a small business owner, my goal is to effectively balance the workload of growth and success and the benefits of slowing down for reflection and necessary change. I am definitely up for the challenge.

I’d love to hear from you. How do you prepare for growth as an entrepreneur? How have you incorporated external learning communities within your growth strategy? Send your comments to me by clicking here.

 

 

You can read more about Junita Flowers on her website junitasjar.com. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

 

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Open Access

Wondering why you should check out the James J. Hill Center’s business resources? Can’t everything be found online nowadays? Not quite. While there are plenty of openly available data resources, often you end up spending your time in place of your money to access and understand them.

Say you’re looking for industrial information? Surely that’s accessible outside a subscription database like IBISWorld? You’re right! Much of the data in IBISWorld reports are gathered from open access resources. These sources can include federal or state government websites, annual reports for publicly traded companies, and general economic indicators published at the national level. For example, the U. S. Census counts more than just people. It also records the number of businesses in certain sectors and industries, which it updates every five years. The Bureau of Labor Statistics releases new information on industry-level employment including information on average employment and projected growth on a regular basis. The Bureau of Economic Analysis has industry and sector data on employment, wages, operations costs, and more at the state level. With all this available data, why bother with subscriptions?

The truth is that these resources are formatted for accuracy, not ease of access for a user. Learning to navigate and decipher government websites, let alone the charts and spreadsheets themselves can be a time-consuming and frustrating endeavor. In the James J. Hill Center’s Business Research Boot Camp, we address what’s publicly accessible and worth digging for and what are more easily found in a subscription database. Typically, while a subscription may cost money, you’re spending that instead of time. There’s no one right way to get data. Just know which of your resources you’re willing to spend!

Curious to learn more about openly accessible resources and how they interact with subscription databases? Check out the Hill’s newest class offering, Business Research Boot Camp. While sold-out for the September session, we’ll be back in November for another round, so please keep an eye on the Hill Center Calendar!

 


Written by Jessica Huffman, Business Outreach Librarian, at the James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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Startup Showcase: A Wearable Affirmation of the Energy Within

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently we connected with presenter Jessica Hoch. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on August 11, 2018. 

Not all startups come from the tech, health care or agriculture, some are more alternative in nature and mind.

According to Fast Company from 2017, there has been a 40 percent increase in Google searches for “crystal healing” and nearly a dozen new crystal retail outlets have opened up in New York and Los Angeles in the past year. In addition the Global Wellness Institute states that the wellness industry made $3.7 trillion in 2015.

Jessica Hoch may not have seen this industry boom coming but instead felt a perfect connection between her love of yoga and her degree in Apparel Design. What originally started as gifts for friends and family turned into her company Moxie Malas, dedicated to self-love, personal power and peace.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Jessica Hoch
Age: 34
City you live in: Circle Pines
City of birth: Shoreview
College attended: UW Stout

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Moxie Malas
Website: www.moxiemalas.com
Business Start Date: July 13, 2015
Number of Employees: 1
Number of customers: 3,000 individuals / 42 retail partners

 

Q&A

Q. What is your history/Who are you?

A. My name is Jessica Hoch and I am the owner and creator of Moxie Malas. I have been a yoga teacher for over nine years and have a degree in Apparel Design; Moxie Malas was the perfect love child of the two worlds. What originally started out as gifts for my family and friends has blossomed into a collection of meaningful jewelry for the people who want what they wear to be intentional and a reflection of their personal journey.

I originally started making Malas because of my love for the energy and power behind the stones and crystals and what it does for the person wearing it. It brings me so much joy to create something for someone who is going to feel wonderful wearing it. Then to have them inspired to meditate because of it is an added bonus.

The jewelry combined with the energy of stones and crystals is the perfect vehicle for the message of self-love, personal power and peace within. We are all on a journey and need to be reminded of how supported and connected we all really are.

Q. What is your business?

A. Moxie Malas is Crystal Healing and Aromatherapy Jewelry inspired by the best version of you and created as a reminder that it already exists within. We also produce workshops and seminars on what it means to live “Peacefully Untamed.”

Q. What is the origin of the business?

A. I was looking for a way to share the message of personal empowerment in a way that made it accessible and approachable for people. I wanted to create something that would help to remind people of their own awesomeness each day.

Q. What problems does your business solve?

A. My business helps people to see the best in themselves and serves as a daily reminder. It helps keep people focusing on the positive in their lives and reminds them of how loved and supported they are on their journey.

Q. Where did you pivot in your company’s journey?

A. One of the biggest pivots we made as a company was figuring out production of the jewelry here locally. It has allowed us to grow and scale the business on the wholesale side of things.

Q. What personal strengths or skill sets do you bring to the business?

A. I bring a broader vision for the future of the company, helping it to keep moving forward. My heart and soul goes into the message of Moxie Malas, so I would say I also bring passion.

Q. What are you most proud of?

A. I am most proud of creating a product that has touched so many people on a deeper level. The idea that the message of the jewelry has helped someone in this journey of life is humbling and an honor to be a part of….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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Get Your Food Truck Cooking

With the long, hot days of summer upon us, plenty of budding entrepreneurs begin to dream of working out of the office, out on the open road. How can someone balance a roving heart and a small business? Open a food truck! Downtown at the Hill, we have plenty of food trucks surrounding Rice Park, but finding the right research to get one started can be a challenge. Save your energy for preparing delicious food and head to the Hill for all your research needs.

You can find a full industry report on food trucks in our IBISWorld database. Get a sense of food truck trends, national regulations, and a five year forecast. Curious whether you should specialize in Mexican cuisine or Peruvian fare? Look at product and service segmentation within the industry for a sense of market concentration at the U.S. level. IBISWorld can also discuss consumer expectations so you know if your customers will expect organic produce or biodegradable plates. By understanding the industry at the national level, you’ll be able to anticipate and prepare for new trends, understand the field’s influencing factors, and fulfill regulatory requirements, letting you concentrate on your recipes.

Interested in reading profiles on successful food truck? Use Business Source Premier to find local newspaper and magazine articles on other trucks. Keyword searching in Business Source Premier will instantly search thousands of trade journals, magazines, and product reviews in addition to publications like Forbes and Fortune. Looking up “Food Trucks” and “Minnesota” will yield articles on award-winning food trucks, truck design, unconventional menu trends, and beyond. This is a fantastic resource to investigate the latest news in the industry while getting in-depth interview from food truck owners on the secrets to their success.

Curious about these resources? Want to know what else the Hill has to offer? Schedule an appointment at jjhill.org to speak with us about everything the Hill can do to support your dreams.

 


Written by Jessica Huffman, Business Outreach Librarian, at the James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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Accelerate & Generate

For startups, financing can be challenging, and often the biggest barrier. Each month we’re focusing on a different financing option in Minnesota for startups and featuring experts in the field. 

Time is the most valuable asset for a company. We meet a lot of founders and it doesn’t matter what vertical they are in or how well the company is doing. There is never enough time in the day or enough days in the week.

As a lean mean growing machine you and your small team wear many hats. You must go raise funds, make sales, plan for the future, hire (and fire) employees, take out the trash and countless other responsibilities. They all take time and effort. At the end of the day, some things fall behind. Often time building relationships with strategic individuals are one of them.

This is where an accelerator comes in to play. One of the biggest value propositions an accelerator can offer is access. What do we mean when we say access? We mean introductions to potential mentors, investors, corporates and other founders in a short amount of time. At gener8tor we make 100+ potential mentor introductions and set up 75+ investor pitches over the span of 12 weeks. If you stop and think about how much time and effort it would take a company to set up and execute 175+ meetings you realize the potential value.

Joining an accelerator means that companies can take chasing strategic introductions off of their to-do list for 12 weeks and beyond. This allows for companies and founders to focus on growth. Our job is to find the best companies and play matchmaker with our network.

This is not the only reason to join an accelerator and for many companies, there are a lot of variables that go into the decision. An accelerator is not for everyone, we are the first to admit it. One question for founders is if they look at this from an objective lens, do they feel the exchange of equity for cash and connections can shorten the timeline to IPO or Exit in a significant manner? If the answer is yes, the financial justification is quite clear. Time is money and we want to save you time!

Surround your company with people, investors, and organizations that help you get there faster. If you’d like to chat and learn more, feel free to connect with me via email adam@gener8tor.com.

Get out there and start something!


Adam is the director of gBETA Medtech, a program of nationally ranked gener8tor. He has previous experience in regulatory affairs, quality assurance, and early-stage product development.

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Underutilized Research Gems

If your first thought when hearing the phrase “government information,” is a stack of boring, bureaucratic reports, you’re not alone. There’s more to government information, however, than you may realize. Several government agencies regularly produce valuable business intelligence and the James J. Hill Center can direct you to some underutilized gems.

If you’re exploring a new industry, the U.S. Census Bureau should be your first stop. The Census does far more than count people; it counts businesses as well! The Economic Census run every five years and collects data at the sector and industrial level along with information about business expenses and industrial growth. The 2017 Census is scheduled for release soon, so keep an eye on that space for the latest information.

Interested in gleaning public company data from the web? Check out the SEC’s EDGAR search tool. Located on the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission website, this tool allows users to pull certain mandated reports for public companies. These include annual reports (10-K), quarterly reports (10-Q), and special announcements (8-K) along with a variety of other documents. If you’re interested in getting the nitty-gritty information on publicly traded companies, using EDGAR can trim down your time spent searching company websites for glossy annual reports.

Want to learn more about government information and how it pertains to your business? Check out the Hill’s Research Boot Camp series. This accelerated class combines government and subscription database information for a 360-look at how business information is gathered and more importantly, how you can use it to succeed.

 


Written by Jessica Huffman, Business Outreach Librarian, at the James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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Startup Showcase: Entrepreneur Meets Restaurateur with New App

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently we connected with presenter Taranvir Johal. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on June 30, 2018. 

Talent defies age when it comes to entrepreneurship and 18 year old Taranvir Johal is proof of that. He already owns one company and has developed an app for another. With his eye on the game and his passion clear, Johal loves to “get his hands dirty.” With his new restaurant app Tavolo, he is jumping on the trend of transforming the restaurant experience.

In its first restaurant industry trends report, Skift Megatrends 2018, Skift Table says “restaurants are also looking to new technology to both enhance and — in some cases — define the in-restaurant dining experience … Touch-screen ordering, cashless transactions, and more personalization can make the experience more exciting for a guest.”

Johal has certainly taken a seat at the table and looked ahead at what restaurants need to be successful and his app Tovolo may just be the answer to fight the delivery boom.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Taranvir Johal
Age: 18
City of Birth: Queens, N.Y.
City you live in: Fargo, N.D.
High School Attended: Oak Grove Lutheran High School
College attended: University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Tavolo
Website: Tavoloapp.co
Twitter: @tavolo_app
Business Start Date: March 25, 2018
Number of Employees: 4

 

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. I am an 18-year-old aspiring entrepreneur that loves to get his hands dirty. I am from Fargo, N.D., and fell in love with entrepreneurship while I was in high school. During my sophomore year, I attended the Yale Young Global Scholars program and met numerous individuals who were pursuing their passions. They inspired me to learn more about what I wanted to do with my life. During my senior year, I participated in the Young Entrepreneurs Academy and launched my first company, Protein+. I just completed my freshman year at the Carlson School of Management and am extremely excited to see what the future has in store.

Q. What is your business?
A. Tavolo is an application that allows users to reserve a table, order, and pay at restaurants through their mobile devices. Moreover, Tavolo provides data to restaurants regarding how specific customers tip, server ratings and reviews, turn time per table, customer preferences, and customer profiles.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. We have created an advisory board with individuals who are more experienced and have more business knowledge than us. We selected these people over the course of two months and tried to incorporate individuals who we believed could help propel our company forward.

Q. What is the origin of the business?
A. Our company started during TechStars Startup Weekend. Abdi Hassan, a junior at the University of St. Thomas, pitched the idea to us and (we) loved it. We ended up winning 2nd place at the event and began meeting with numerous entrepreneurs around Minneapolis who loved our idea as well. This eventually led us to speak at 1 Million Cups Saint Paul.

Q. What problems does your business solve?
A. Our business minimizes the time wasted while dining out at restaurants. Tavolo gives users full control of their dining experience. With the click of a button a consumer can order their food, request for a waiter, and even pay for their meal.

Q. Where did you pivot in your company’s journey? What big obstacle or hurdle did you have to overcome?
A. We initially wanted to be an application that allows users to order and pay for their meals prior to arriving to the restaurant. We eventually realized that consumers enjoy adding more items to their meal while they are dining. We decided to pivot and allow users to pay for their meals once they we done dining. We also learned that consumers dislike waiting for their server to come to their table. Therefore, we pivoted by creating a feature on the app that allows users to call their waiter simply by tapping their phone screen….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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Angel Investors and Their Criteria for an Investment

For startups, financing can be challenging, and often the biggest barrier. Each month we’re focusing on a different financing option in Minnesota for startups and featuring experts in the field. 

It is important to first understand that angel investors and VCs all share one thing in common: the need for a return on their investment. This is not philanthropy. Even Impact Investors who may accept lower rates of return, still need that ROI.

After a founder understands this, one must realize that there are angel investors who specialize in an industry while others are “agnostic” meaning they are open to all industries.  Do your homework in advance of contacting investors.

What all investors rate highest in evaluating a deal is the strength of the team.

  • Does the management team have the relevant skills to be successful?
  • The team should bring diverse skill sets to the business.
  • After funding, who would be the first hires to help round out the team?
  • If not the management team, are there mentors or an advisory board to help guide the management team.
  • The gold star is a founder or early team member that has been through the business stages from concept to an exit.
  • Many investors like to see some “skin in the game”. Have the founders invested in their own startup?
  • Passion for their concept
  • Are the founders coachable? Will they listen to others and sift through their advice for better ways to build the company?

A great team can carry a good concept to success. A dysfunctional team can kill the best business models.

Back to the ROI…

Is there an exit in the plan? The business can be very successful but without an exit there is generally no ROI. Ideally, investors would like to see an exit (acquisition or an IPO for example) in 5 to 7 years. There are other ways to structure an exit. This could be a form of revenue sharing or a guaranteed founder buy out of the investors.

 

David Russick is an established entrepreneur and angel investor. Russick is co-founder, Managing Director, and Board Member of Gopher Angels.  Russick was also founder and CEO of TUBS, Inc., a family owned waste and recycling business operating in the Twin Cities, Denver and Cleveland.   In addition, Russick serves on the Board of Advisors for the Dakota Venture Group.  Russick has been featured in the “Star Tribune,” “Twin Cities Business,” and the “Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal.” “Twin Cities Business” named him a “2014 People to Know – Finance.”  

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It’s Tough to Stump a Librarian

The Hill Center has a rich archival history of our early years, including original book receipts from 1918, annual reports beginning in 1917, and even reference correspondence from as early as 1921.

The reference correspondence, which includes written requests for information and specific books, demonstrates both what people were researching here ninety years ago and what truly remarkable information finders librarians are!

One of the most fun discoveries was the numerous requests for the identity of a poem—usually with the patron providing only little or incorrect information.

In 1930, someone wrote in to the Hill asking, “Would you be kind enough to advise from what the following quotation was taken. ‘None knew him but to honor him; / None named him but to praise.’” Our diligent librarians discovered this to be the beginning of “On the Death of Joseph Rodman Drake, September 1820,” a poem by Fitz Green Halleck. 

How did they do it? While we can never say for sure since the processes for particular reference questions weren’t written down, we can assume it was how most research was done those days: mainly a matter of immense knowledge and familiarity with the subject and the library catalog. It’s possible we had a librarian who specialized in literature or, if not, outsourced the question to an outside librarian or expert. 

The editor of “The Daily Argus-Leader” in Sioux Falls, SD, was a particularly curious man. He once quipped in a letter to the Hill that, “I begin to feel there ought to be fees charged for my inquiries.” He often needed help identifying poems. In 1929, he wrote in: 

Have you anything in your anthologies whereby you could give authorship and “location” of old poem about the goat that used a shirt off the clothes line to flag a train? 

It thus begins: 

There was a goat—a one-eyed goat— 

And he was old enough to vote etc. 

Our librarians performed beautifully, promptly sending off the following response: 

The version which I found of the poem of a goat that flagged a train reads as follows: 

A HARLEM GOAT 

A Harlem goat was feeling fine,
Ate nine red shirts off Sallie’s line
Sal grabbed a stick, gave the goat a whack
And tied him to the railroad track.
A fast express was drawing nigh,
The Harlem goat was doomed to die
But with an awful shriek of pain
The Harlem goat coughed up those shirts and flagged the train.  

(Our research department today enjoyed learning more about Harlem goats here and here, even though the latter features a different version of the poem.)

But even the Hill librarians got stumped time to time. Our prolific friend in Sioux Falls wrote in, in 1928: 

“An inquiry comes to this office about a poem the burden of which is the following. There is a steep hill and a road runs down the land below. There is a number of accidents happening there and an ambulance is stationed at the foot of the hill to gather up the wounded. Some one [sic] suggests that a railing be placed on the side of the road going down hill [sic], but some one [sic] also says it is not necessary since there is an ambulance at the foot to receiving the injured. Did you ever hear about this?” 

Unfortunately, our librarians had not heard about this, even after scouring our poetry anthologies. 

Today it’s (usually!) easy to identify a poem or song from misremembered lines by typing them into Google, but for topics such as private company information, consumer behavior, and five-year industry forecasts, it’s still best to consult the experts. For your tough business questions, come in to check out our free specialized business databases, or connect one-on-one with a business research specialist through a Hill membership or premium research services. 

 


Written by Ann Mayhew, Reference & Support Specialist, at the James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library our our historic collection at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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IMPORTANT NOTICE:

Patrons with accessibility needs please access our ground floor elevator entrance via Kellogg Ave at the back of the building. Please ring the doorbell on the right hand side of door and a Hill staff member will assist you. If you have questions or concerns please call 651.265.5500. We look forward to having you visit.

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