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She Tells Rochester’s Startup Stories

Leah Kodner, Business Librarian from the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters each month for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently she connected with presenter Amanda Leightner. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase on September 9, 2017.

Startups need publicity. Without publicity, nobody will know that a startup exists, what it does, or why it matters.

Startups also benefit from being part of a startup community, where entrepreneurs support one another and share their expertise. These startup communities also need publicity, in order to share news about events, resources for entrepreneurs, and more.

Amanda Leightner was impressed with the Rochester startup community but saw that it lacked publicity. She started Rochester Rising both to provide publicity for Rochester entrepreneurs and to inform outsiders of all that the Rochester startup community has to offer.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Amanda Leightner
Age: 32
City you live in: Rochester
City of birth: Pittsburgh, Pa.
High school attended: Highlands High School, Natrona Heights, Pa.
Colleges attended: Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa.

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Rochester Rising
Website: www.rochesterrising.org
Business Start Date: July 18, 2016
Number of Employees: 1

 

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. I’m a trained molecular biologist with over 12 years of experience in biomedical research. Even though I spent 6 years obtaining a PhD and continued to do postdoctoral studies, I knew that a career in science was not for me. After graduating from Mayo Graduate School, I decided to do my postdoctoral research at the UMN and spend that time gaining experience to try doing something else.

I had always enjoyed writing, and thought I could explore a career as a science or medical writer, but at the time I lacked the experience. I did an internship with Life Science Alley Association, where I really got interested in the science business community in Minnesota.

Afterwards, I got in touch with a researcher I had worked with at Mayo Clinic, Jamie Sundsbak, who ran a supportive group for life science entrepreneurs in Rochester called BioAM. A few months later, I received a call from Jamie asking me to help him build up a website and online presence of BioAM and help share stories of life science innovation in Minnesota.I wrote stories about science entrepreneurship around the Minneapolis area and built up this web presence for about a year and a half, calling it Life Science Nexus.

In January 2016, I completely took over running and operating Life Science Nexus. That May, I decided to go full in on being an entrepreneur myself with the online news site. I moved from Minneapolis back to Rochester to be in closer contact with Jamie as I grew the business. After living in Rochester for only a few weeks, I realized how much the entrepreneurial community as a whole was growing, and how little anyone was talking about it.

In July, Life Science Nexus was pivoted into Rochester Rising to amplify the stories of all entrepreneurship, expanding beyond life sciences, and focusing in on the Rochester area. Now I run all aspects of the business as a solo entrepreneur.

Q. What is your business?
A. Rochester Rising is an online news site that amplifies the stories of entrepreneurship occurring in Rochester. We put out several articles and a podcast every week taking an in-depth look at Rochester startups and innovative small businesses and really take the time to understand the person behind the business and how they started it in Rochester.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. The entrepreneurial community in Rochester is a fantastic resource. You can always find someone who is a few steps ahead of you who is willing to give advice and encouragement.

Q. What problems does your business solve?
A. Even a few years ago, there was not much of an entrepreneurial community in Rochester. While still small, we now have an entrepreneurial core that is growing every day…READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.JJHill.org.

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The American Hospital Directory: A Hidden Gem

The region spanning from the Twin Cities metro area down to Rochester is such a hotbed of healthcare organizations and medical device companies that it’s known as “Medical Alley.” In fact, a 2015 article by EMSI notes that the Twin Cities Medical Alley has far more medical-related jobs than any other metro area in the United States, over 10,000 more than New York. Minnesota is clearly a leader in the medical industry housing such influential companies as 3M, Medtronic, the Mayo Clinic and the Medical Alley Association.

The business reference library at the James J. Hill Center is here to help professionals in the medical device industry find the information they need. We offer a highly specialized database, the American Hospital Directory.  This database can be accessed for free at the Hill Center in downtown Saint Paul.

The American Hospital Directory is a tool that medical device sales professionals find invaluable for finding detailed information about hospitals in their market. Data is collected from both public and private sources such as Medicare claims, hospital cost reports and commercial licencors. Using this directory, you can learn a hospital’s specialties, bed count, revenue broken down by services and more.

This type of research is a vital tool in the medical field.  To have the ability to compare and contrast hospitals by patient statistics, revenue and services puts you at the top of your game and on the road to success. Stop by the Hill today, have a conversation with one of our business librarians and use this hidden gem.


Written by: Leah Kodner, Business Librarian, James J. Hill Center.

If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or [email protected].

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Soft Skills Revolution: Memorization

“Chris Carlson is an entrepreneur, actor,  lawyer and the founder of NarrativePros dedicated to coaching stronger connections. Chris is setting the standard for soft skills training across the region and will be sharing his tips and tricks in our monthly blog Soft Skills Revolution. Come back the first Tuesday of each month and learn key steps to unleash your efficiency, effectiveness and maximize your input.

Memorization – Helping Your Audience by Helping Yourself

Memorization is a misunderstood tool speakers don’t use enough. Proper memorization techniques can increase your comfort and audience appeal exponentially. The secret begins and ends with a simple question.

What does it mean?

When I work with someone on a presentation I ask them a series of questions:

What are you telling me?
How is it different?
Why should I care?

Audiences will answer those questions with or without you. Speakers who embrace this will be in a better position to play a role in their own fate. Speakers who ignore this, risk the audience missing the point.

The effective way to memorize anything begins with understanding its meaning. An actor memorizing a role begins by understanding the plot of the play.

Memorization Gets a Bad Rap

Some people think memorization is a dirty word. First, it does take work and second even some “experts” say you might sound “memorized”.

I’m here to tell you it’s an worthwhile investment. Don’t let the fear of failure or sounding “memorized” dissuade you. Understanding how memorization really works lets you adjust your focus appropriately.

I don’t recommend trying to memorize your whole speech, word for word. I do strongly recommend memorizing parts of it. The payoff is huge. You’ll be more comfortable and confident with your message and this will delight and engage your audience. The result is giving AND leaving them with a better sense of your intended meaning.

Piece by Piece

You can make the most of memorization if you approach it piece by piece. Not word by word. Think of it as a series of interconnected “meanings.”

The most important “meaning” you need to nail down is the Big Idea”. What does your speech mean to your audience? This is something you need to know so well that you can say it in your sleep. Again, if you don’t know what your speech means, how can you expect your audience to?

And if it’s hard for you to memorize, that means it is going to be hard for the audience to hear. Make the meaning clear, concise and compelling.

Brick by Brick

If you’re on a roll and ambitious, memorize the teeny, tiny bricks of meaning: the words. Think of the entire structure of memorization as a series of interconnecting lego-bricks each building on one other.  Each brick is a nugget of meaning. Get to know each of them intimately. This is the fundamental principle to mnemonic techniques:

– Chunking: Turning strings of letters or numbers into more meaningful bits
Visualization: Transforming meaning into vivid images that you can link together.
–  Memory Palaces: Taking images and placing them in a familiar location like your home.

No matter how deep you go down” memory lane” try to always memorize the first minute of your speech. Trust me, your audience will thank you and you will be helping yourself. Learn your part and play your role. You will be amazed by the results.


Guest writer:
 Chris Carlson
Visit @NarrativePros for more information.

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Startup Secrets and Sh#$ to Know: Graduate’s Hustle Handbook To Entrepreneurship

Aleckson Nyamwaya has his beat on the pulse of the startup world in MN.  He is an Associate at @gener8tor, contributor for @startupgrind, ambassador for @1millioncupsspl and a lover of all things tech & startups. We are pleased to have his monthly insight with our blog “Startup Secrets and Sh#$ to Know.”  Check back each month for his thoughts, observations and featured companies.

Recent Graduate’s Hustle Handbook To Entrepreneurship

Are you a recent grad? Want to get involved with entrepreneurship?

What you need are friends.

Other people will call them “connections” but I think that’s a buzzword that doesn’t mean anything anymore.

To do this, you’ll need a healthy combination of online and offline hustling…

  1.  Discover and engage with them online
  2. Connect with them in person

Easy right?

Below I’ve outlined steps on how you can discover the right people and connect with them. Ask good questions and ask for advice – what would they do if they were in your position? Finally, provide value. Literally ask them how you can help!

1. What is your goal?

What is your journey, why are you doing this? What is your end goal.
Understanding your end goal will help you create a more concrete plan and will also keep you motivated when you are thinking about quitting.

2. Get on Twitter

Follow and engage with local influences on Twitter with the goal of setting up a meeting in real life. Once you set up a live meeting, you are ready for step 4.

Influences can be journalist who write about your local internship scene, meetup and hackathon hosts, current founders, entrepreneurs with exits, investors, people who lead organizations that are dedicated to serving entrepreneurs etc.

3. Live events

Other good places to meet people involved with startups/tech and entrepreneurship are Meetups, hackathons, reach out to local organizations like accelerators, venture firms, current startups, etc.

4. Share your story

Once you’ve connected with local influences and people who are where you want to be, ask them questions. Find out how they got where they are today!

– What did they do to get here?
– Share your story.
– What would they do if they were in your shoes?

At the end of the meeting ask them “how can I help you?”

5. Provide value

How will you provide value?

Are you a coder? Are you a Google Analytics wizard? Facebook ads? Salesforce? Business development? Maybe you’ve had a few projects to show for it, etc. Offering services for free is a common “get-your-foot-in-the-door-technique.”

It’s 2017, if you can Google, you have a special skill.

At the very least you can manage a social media account. So don’t even say that you don’t have any skills.

Pro-Tips

  • Checkout the business section of your local newspaper, or local entrepreneurship blog
  • Angel lists are a great place to find startups
  • If a startup recently raised money ,chances are they are hiring
  • Same with VC firms
  • Follow up with emails within 1 hour (or 24 hours max)

Conclusion

Stick to the process and you will eventually luck out and connect with someone who is gracious enough to give you a shot.

When you do, work you butt off, under promise, over deliver and go above and beyond. The last thing you want to do is disrespect and embarrass the person who stuck their neck out for you.

If you drop the ball, don’t worry it happens, do not make this a habit. Follow up ASAP and remember, actions speak louder than words.


You can tweet me @alecksonn or subscribe to my newsletter

 

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The Birth of GovDocs

Zach Stabenow is the CEO and Co-Founder of GovDocs. We had the opportunity to connect with  Zach about his entrepreneurial journey starting GovDocs and GovDelivery.  His story of success and thoughts on what is important are an inspiration for anyone taking the steps to make their dream happen.

How did your entrepreneurial journey begin?
It started in a studio basement apartment in the City of St. Paul with a small desk, one Dell computer with a dial-up modem and a futon for a bed.  I was fresh out of the University of Minnesota having been in the work force (tech industry) for only two years, when the entrepreneurial bug bit me.  My mother was a school teacher turned entrepreneur who started and ran a small business during my childhood and her father had a number of entrepreneurial ventures in North St. Paul so it was probably inevitable that I would have a passion for starting my own business just based on hereditariness.  So in June of 1999, I co-founded two companies; GovDocs and GovDelivery with a close friend, Scott Burns, as my business partner.

What are your current projects and or business ventures you are working on?
I currently own and run GovDocs, which is now independent from GovDelivery. GovDocs employs 50 people and growing who have a passion for providing employment law management software, data, and print solutions to the largest companies in North America.

What are the most important things to consider when starting a new idea / venture or start up?
Focus first on addressing a small niche market that is being under served.  Then, go serve that tiny market better than anyone else in the world for years, or even a decade.  It is incredibly tempting for entrepreneurs to build a business that serves a mass market right out of start-up phase because of the attractiveness of scale, but what I’ve learned is that your business first must prove that it can be #1 or #2 at something on a smaller level before it can advance to serving a mass market.

What resources did you use when starting your journey?
Books.  I read a lot of business books and trade publications before starting my entrepreneurial journey.  The most useful books that contributed to my business learning though were the historical biographies and auto-biographies of entrepreneurs who shaped our country’s history through business.  Ironically, one of those important biographies, was The Life of James J. Hill by Joseph Pyle and I also studied Highways of Progress written by Hill himself.  I have found that the most valuable business lessons come from reading and learning from those who have come long before us who are able to offer their life-time perspective of experience, rather than a recent business fad or technique.

How did you leverage the resources at the Hill Center?
Several years ago, I decided to examine GovDocs’ potential for additional strategic expansion from our core product offering.  To know whether my market hunch had any validity, I needed more empircal data.  A business acquaintance had suggested I use James J. Hill Center’s research library databases to gather data profiles on the largest companies in the U.S. so that I could analyze their geographical locations and other attributes.  That data and analysis turned-out to be crucial to convincing me and our leadership team to pursue our next strategic expansion opportunity.  Today, we still refer to that data when analyzing how well we are capturing market share.

What or who has made the biggest impact on your entrepreneurial career so far?
My mother.  If she hadn’t made the entrepreneurial leap herself, I wouldn’t have had the front-row seat to see what real guts and determination it takes to risk personal failure and money and to push through all the adversity required to start and grow a business. What has been the largest hurdle and / or success you have experienced as an entrepreneur?

Getting the very first customer (or set of customers) to purchase and use our products/services has always been the biggest hurdle when entering new markets.

What advice would you give to other entrepreneurs just getting out of gate?
Research the market you’re about to live in.  You can have a huge competitive advantage if you put effort and time in to this step.

What advice would you give to entrepreneurs that are stuck or have had their first failure?
Immediately perform physical movement on activities that will inch your business forward.  Make another phone call, write another email, design another prototype, interview a prospective customer… do anything that gets you physically moving and the business forward.  This helps bring your mental determination back and it gets one more item done for the business. Then repeat that 10,000 more times.

What is it about Minnesota and the entrepreneurial ecosystem and how has it managed to keep you here?Two key reasons:

  1. Minnesota has a long and consistent history of incubating some of the most successful entrepreneurs and businesses in the world.  That history and tradition motivates me.
  2. Minnesota weather and mosquito’s make for a hardy work force to hire from and build great teams. Whether you grew up here or were a transplant, to endure -15 temperatures, snow and mosquito bites year in and year out will turn almost anyone into a consistently hard-working team member. You can’t get that Silicon Valley.

The James J. Hill Center mission honors the legacy of its founder by continuing to support entrepreneurial spirit in the 21st Century. We offer researchprograms, and networking for each stage of business development. Our efforts also include services to the broader community through the hosting of cultural and artistic programming and events.  Visit us in downtown Saint Paul at 80 West Fourth Street, off the corner of Market and Fourth.  

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Best State to Start a Business

When it comes to finding a community that supports and empowers entrepreneurs and small businesses, look no further than the Twin Cities and surrounding suburbs. Nationally recognized as the place where business starts and thrives, the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area has the 4th highest concentration of small businesses in the nation, making it the 3rd “Best State to Start a Business” (Entrepreneur.com).

The area’s library systems have long been important resources to enriching life. A new video series called Libraries out Loud out of Kansas City explores how libraries are adapting to the needs of today, including finding ways to support local entrepreneurs. It is not much different in the Twin Cities where in a collaborative effort to support the growing entrepreneurial population, the James J. Hill Center provides resources complimenting the offerings at neighboring libraries.

The Hill often works together with Hennepin County Library and St. Paul Public Library to provide the best business information for entrepreneurs. This has always been part of the Hill’s mission. In our first year in business, head librarian Joseph Pyle explained in the 1921 Librarian Report, that James J. Hill intended for the library to “pick up where the public library ended,” which is exactly where our mission falls today. We fill in the gaps with our unique programs and resources.

On Monday, Aug. 21 from 5:30-7:30pm, Lindsey Dyer (JJHC), Erin Cavell (HCL) and Amanda Feist (SPPL) from our three area libraries will conduct a presentation called “Fill in the blanks of your business plan: getting started with research,” hosted by George Latimer Library.  This presentation will share resources, tips and tricks to navigate the best that our metro libraries have to offer.  SIGN UP NOW to join this informational free event.

Written by Lindsey Dyer, Director of Library Services, James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or [email protected].

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Collection Curiosities: Book Sets

Among the many interesting items one finds when combing the shelves of the James J. Hill Center’s library collection are several dozen book sets. Included are biographies; histories of places and events; personal papers of presidents, diplomats, explorers and businessmen; and government records. Publication dates reach as far back as the early 1800s (some before the birth of Mr. Hill himself).

The oldest? Sparks’s American Biography, a ten volume set originally published in 1834. It set out to include, according to its editor, “all persons, who have been distinguished in America, from the date of its first discovery to the present time,” with the hope that it “would embrace a perfect history of our country.” Though the more familiar faces of this early period of American history are absent, it sheds light on others who were believed important at the time. Beginning with John Stark, an American officer in the Revolutionary War, it tells of other early war heroes as well as physicians, inventors, engineers, and even a little-known signer of the Declaration of Independence. These individuals represent some of the most notable figures of the 18th and early 19th century, many whose lives began nearly three hundred years ago or more, and, perhaps, were those whom Mr. Hill might have admired or even emulated.

Written by Alex Ingham, Business Librarian, James J. Hill Center. 
If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or [email protected].

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They’ll help local investors buy local (businesses)

Leah Kodner, Business Librarian from the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters each month for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently she connected with presenter Patrick Saxton. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase on July 30, 2017.

MNstarter

Equity crowdfunding allows entrepreneurs to sell private securities in their company to investors. These offerings are usually restricted to large “accredited” investors who meet certain wealth and income standards. Now, Minnesota has made it possible to sell these securities to any resident of Minnesota. The MNvest law, which went into effect in June 2016, makes it legal for businesses to release equity crowdfunding offerings to Minnesota residents regardless of their wealth. Patrick Saxton saw the opportunities that this new law provided and formed MNstarter to help businesses launch successful equity crowdfunding campaigns.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

  • Patrick Saxto
  • Age: 35
  • City you live in: White Bear Lake
  • City of birth: Blue Earth, MN
  • High school attended: North St. Paul
  • Colleges attended: Graduate of Metropolitan State. Attended University of North Dakota, Drake University, and Century College

COMPANY PROFILE

  • Name of company: MNstarter
  • Website: www.mnstarter.com
  • Business start date: September 2016
  • Number of employees: 5 co-founders and 1 intern

Q&A

What led to this point?
I worked with the Department of Veterans Affairs, first as a business analyst in the benefits division, then as the primary Information Security and FISMA policy writer for 23 regional offices. I spent my remaining time in government working at the Small Business Administration (SBA), helping entrepreneurs start and grow their small businesses and working to expand SBA’s reach in Minnesota. I am now working as a software engineer and completing my degree in computer application development at Metropolitan State University.

What is your business?
MNstarter is a public benefit corporation whose mission is to grow Minnesota companies through local investment. MNstarter is a registered MNvest portal operator and advocate for capital crowdfunding.

MNstarter offers free access to the MNstarter.com MNvest crowdfunding portal along with best practice guides for self-service capital crowdfunding campaigns. It also offers access to the MNstarter Resource Library, which is an organized group of “resource partners” who can work directly with entrepreneurs to navigate legal, finance and marketing considerations to get their capital campaigns set up.

Where do you go for help when you need it?
We go to the MNstarter Resource Library and the folks at MNvest.org, the outreach and advocacy group for the MNvest legislation.

What is the origin of the business?
MNstarter was started after I watched a 1 Million Cups presentation at the James J. Hill Center by Zach Robbins and Scott Cole. I went back to our office and started to talk about the MNvest law and over the next few weeks we had a core group of us that were ready to make MNstarter a real company. About three months after we started, Judy Wright, our fifth and final founder, found us on the internet and emailed us the same week we had decided to go looking for a finance specialist to round out our group. Since then, the five of us have been working to help Minnesotans find ways to meet their business and investment goals.

What problems does your business solve?
MNstarter solves the need created by new Minnesota MNvest legislation that permits intrastate investment crowdfunding through securities offerings exempt from Securities Act registration. The MNVest law allows companies to sell equity in their companies to Minnesota residents. Minnesota residents not considered “accredited investors” have equal opportunity to invest in these offerings. Under most federal rules, non-accredited investors would not have this opportunity. This creates a larger pool of possible investors. It also gives all Minnesotans the opportunity to invest locally.

MNvest went into effect in June 2016, and requires that these MNvest “offerings” must be made online through a “MNvest Portal” registered with the Minnesota Department of Commerce.

Lots of times we hear “buy local”. At MNstarter, we like to say, “buy local (businesses).” CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE


Interviewer: Leah Kodner
Business Librarian, James J. Hill Center

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit 1millioncups.com/stpaul.

 

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Soft Skills Revolution: Finding Soft Skill Value

Chris Carlson is an entrepreneur, actor,  lawyer and the founder of NarrativePros dedicated to coaching stronger connections. Chris is setting the standard for soft skills training across the region and will be sharing his tips and tricks in our monthly blog Soft Skills Revolution. Come back the first Tuesday of each month and learn key steps to unleash your efficiency, effectiveness and maximize your input.

FINDING SOFT SKILL VALUE

I used to have a hard time finding my keys. Then I bought this little plastic disk that my phone can make beep. They’re usually sitting right on the counter, hidden in plain sight.

A recent survey of 2.6 million employers reported that 59% have difficulty finding candidates who are proficient in “soft skills.” I believe that soft skilled people are really not that hard to find. They just need to tag their skills with the equivalent of that beeping disk.

Making your own soft skill set “beep” out begins with understanding why they’re “soft”, what are the skills and the value to employers.

The Soft
Among the most sought-after soft skills are the “4 Cs”: Critical Thinking, Communication, Collaboration and Creativity.

The term soft skills was originally defined by the Army in 1972 as

“Job functions about which we know a good deal are hard skills and those about which we know very little are soft skills.”

From the beginning soft skills have been associated with misunderstanding.

One of the biggest insights to soft skills is how little we know about them and ourselves. Studies like Sage Journals “Perceived Versus Actual Transparency of Goals in Negotiation” have shown how we believe others see us and what they actually perceive are statistically unrelated. The only accurate way to gauge how you’re being perceived is to ask someone else.

And yet, as Seth Godin points out “what actually separates thriving organizations from struggling ones are the difficult-to-measure attitudes, processes and perceptions of the people who do the work.”

The Skills
In that aptly titled post, “Let’s Stop Calling Them ’Soft Skills,” Godin argues that the term should be avoided:

“We call these skills soft, making it easy for us to move on to something seemingly more urgent. We rarely hire for these attributes because we’ve persuaded ourselves that vocational skills are impersonal and easier to measure.”

He feels that they are more accurately understood as “real skills” because of their impact on businesses:

“…when an employee demoralizes the entire team by undermining a project, or when a team member checks out and doesn’t pull his weight, or when a bully causes future stars to quit the organization — too often, we shrug and point out that this person has tenure, or vocational skills or isn’t so bad. But they’re stealing from us.”

He then goes on to list nearly 100 different skill sets in five categories that make up his first draft of real skills.

The Value
Godin’s argument carries significant weight when you consider how reliant the economy is on soft skills. Three decades ago 83% of the value of an S&P 500 company was in its tangible assets—real estate, equipment, inventory. Today 87% of the value is in intangible assets—ideas, brand, or stories.

Companies that had paid workers to build value with their labor now pay them to create with their minds. The majority of companies’ value can no longer be delivered by trucks. Instead, the majority of worth is created, transmitted and maintained through soft skill mastery.

Developing mastery is also hiding in plain sight. The process is the same one practiced by athletes, artists and entrepreneurs.

More on that later. I have to find my phone.

To be continued….

Guest writer: Chris Carlson
Visit @NarrativePros for more information.

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Startup Day Across America: Get Involved

James J.  Hill Center has been supporting Minnesota innovators for 96 years by connecting business, entrepreneurs and community to research, knowledge and network.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, firms less than one year old created 1.7 million jobs, or 60% of total employment growth, in 2015. More than half these jobs were from firms with fewer than 10 employees.  The startup companies we support are involved in a variety of industries including technology, retail, healthcare, food and beverage, education and more.

On August 1, 2017, members of Congress have been invited to celebrate the ingenuity and entrepreneurship taking place right in their own cities. Startup Day Across America connects elected officials with startups in their communities so they can learn about the challenges new companies face and meet the business leaders building the future.

This bipartisan, bicameral effort also raises awareness and helps generate support for startup communities across the country.  Last August marked the third annual Startup Day and Minnesota’s Senator Al Franken participated.

Each startup organization has withstood the challenges and obstacles of entrepreneurialism, and many continue to grow, foster job creation and improve our economic ecosystem.

August 1st is an important day for all entrepreneurs – successful, new, struggling or persevering.  This is a time when you get to show them what is needed, what steps should be taken and what change needs to be made.  This is a time for your voice to be heard and celebrated.

If your startup is interested in participating, contact your local representative and request a visit. Work with Startup Day 2017 and make it happen.  We don’t get opportunities like this all the time.

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IMPORTANT NOTICE:

Patrons with accessibility needs please access our ground floor elevator entrance via Kellogg Ave at the back of the building. Please ring the doorbell on the right hand side of door and a Hill staff member will assist you. If you have questions or concerns please call 651.265.5500. We look forward to having you visit.

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