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Startup Secrets and Sh#$ to Know: Hustle Your Way Through TCSW 2017

Aleckson Nyamwaya has his beat on the pulse of the startup world in Minnesota.  He is an Associate at @gener8tor, contributor for @startupgrind, ambassador for @1millioncupsspl and a lover of all things tech & startups. We are pleased to have his monthly insight with our blog “Startup Secrets and Sh#$ to Know.”  Check back each month for his thoughts, observations and featured companies.

Hustle Your Way Through TCSW 2017

Make the most of Twin Cities Startup Week by following this networking guide.

TCSW is the premiere week-long entrepreneurship festival of the Twin Cities. Showcasing the best from the startup capital of the north! Over 100 events will take place across the Twin Cities, October 9th−15th, 2017. Everyone one and their cousins will be in attendance!!

Twin Cities Startup Week is just 2 weeks away!!! Naturally, I wrote a guide to help you navigate the week!

There are multiple events happening concurrently so this may be helpful to you if it’s your first time, if you are too busy to curate an itinerary for the week or if you just want a curated list from an insider!

For the full list of events, dates, times and locations please visit: http://twincitiesstartupweek.com/

Keynote Events

These are the events you should make time for! Especially if you are on a tight schedule and can only make it to 1, 2 or maybe 3 days out of the week!

1. Opening Night Party — Sunday

This is a high priority because it’s the kickoff party for TCSW! Everyone is attending to specifically kick off the week! Which means it will a more relaxed atmosphere, perfect for networking & making new friends.

2. MN Cup — Monday

Minnesota Cup is the largest statewide startup competition in the country! The evening will include a demo hour from our top 24 teams, recognizing our mentors of the year, presentations from the 2017 MN Cup division winners & runners-up as well as the announcement of the 2017 MN Cup Grand Prize winner. Over $450,000 will be awarded at the event!

3. Beta.MN Showcase — Tuesday

Beta.MN is an organization of friends & founders gathering together to support Minnesota’s startup community. Showcase is like a science fair for startups, with beer & music. There are no formal presentations, just local entrepreneurs demonstrating their products and services in an approachable, one-to-one setting. Attendees include founders, future employees, superfans, investors, friends, family members and anyone wanting to discover and celebrate local innovation.

4. gener8tor Minnesota’s Premiere Night — Tuesday

gener8tor is a nationally ranked, concierge startup accelerator that invests in high-growth startups! Premiere night is a celebration of gener8tor’s latest class of innovative startups!

5. Target + Techstars Retail Accelerator Demo Day — Wednesday

Techstars Retail, in partnership with Target is a three-month intensive startup accelerator focused on bringing new technology, experiences, products, and solutions to retail. Join us for Techstars Retail in Partnership with Target Demo Day in Minneapolis as our companies take the stage at First Avenue to present their businesses!

6. Minnedemo27 — Thursday

Minnedemo will feature some of the best the local tech talent has to offer. The rules are simple: 7 minutes, real working technology, and NO slides! This event attracts 700+ entrepreneurs, investors, enthusiasts etc. Please note: they are not sold out, Minnedomo has 3 ticket releases and their last one was on 10/5 at 7pm.

7. Twin Cities Startup Weekend Youth— Friday

Startup Weekend will propel students to launch creative businesses by pitching ideas, form teams around the top ideas, research their customers, and work intensely as teams to build a prototype that demonstrates the potential of their business. At the end, teams present their business and demonstrate their prototype to a panel of local entrepreneurs in a “Shark Tank Setting.”

8. Techstars Startup Weekend Twin Cities— Friday

Startup Weekend is an intense 54 hour experience, providing entrepreneurs a unique experience to create a company, product or service over the weekend. Individuals will pitch their ideas Friday night and form teams with other attendees. Wrapping up on Sunday, they’ll pitch their prototype app, website, product or service to a panel of startup judges.

9. Official Twin Cities Startup Week Awards — Join us as we close out Twin Cities Startup Week with the biggest party of the week. We will be holding our first annual Startup Awards ceremony alongside GoKart Labs.

Honorable Mentions

If you have time during the day, be sure to take advantage of the following events!

  1. Free co-working —  Take advantage of the free opportunities! Co-working spaces such as COCO are the backbone of the TC Startup entrepreneurship culture! (I myself work out of coco uptown).
  2. gener8tor office hours — gener8tor is a nationally ranked concierge startup accelerator, come meet with their Minneapolis team for office hours!
  3. Sofia Fund office hours – Sophia Fund seeks early stage, growth oriented, gender diverse entrepreneurial companies that have women leaders! Come meet with them for office hours.
  4. Angel Investing 101 — Brett Brohl, Managing partner of The Syndicate Fund is well regarded local investor!
  5. Healthcare.MN 5 year Anniversary Party — Healthcare.MN is a founding member and a strong supporter of the Twin Cities Startup scene. It’s a high quality event that attracts a great turn out! Food and drinks.
  6. Womens Pitch Fest — Female founders and women startup leaders will pitch their companies to Midwest investors and community supporters. Applications are now being taken. Entrepreneurs apply here.
  7. Muster Across America — Curated by Bunker Labs Mpls, a nonprofit by veterans, for veterans, to start and grow businesses. If you are not a veteran you will gain the military entrepreneurial edge. If you are a veteran you will gain the network to quickly grow your venture.
  8. Mpls Jr Devs — This event is for aspiring and junior software engineers to meet, learn from, and share experiences with one another.
  9. 1 Million Cups St.Paul — Developed by the Kauffman Foundation, 1MC is a community of innovators and entrepreneurship enthusiasts: Super high quality event!
  10. Mac Startups Demo Day 2017–16 Macalester students took part in Mac Startups, a student-run entrepreneurship incubator. After identifying problems in the Twin Cities community (and beyond) they developed creative products to solve these problems.
  11. Demo Night: Teams from Startup Weekend Youth – Come and see the progress made by several of the teams.
  12. Technical Architecture: Building and Scaling —Whether you are looking to start coding an application, building onto it, or scaling, technology is always changing. What works best for building something quick? What work best for scaling?. What languages work best for rapid prototyping, and what does scalable infrastructure look like these days?
  13. Saint Paul Start-up Crawl — Lets show Saint Paul some love! See where people make and create on a day-to-day basis. Whether it’s brick-and-timber warmth to steam punk buzz, Saint Paul continues to drive innovation.
  14. Minimum Viable Marketing – Marketing is one thing almost every start-up struggles with — how much do you need to do, what talent do you need to do it right, and what sort of resources should you be spending? Panel + Q&A.
  15. Minnesota Start-Up Darwin Lessons — Taking a somewhat lighthearted look at some past mistakes by Minnesota companies, the presenters will talk about what happened and why and offer some tips on how your company can avoid the same fate.
  16. How to become a fundable founder— This talk will focus on the tactics a founder needs to adopt in order to be taken seriously within the startup world! Shameless plug for my event 😉

Conclusion

Twin Cities startup week is the premiere entrepreneurship festival of the twin cities! It’s a great opportunity for you to network, connect with other community members and forge new relationships!

Remember this is a once-in-a-year opportunity, so be sure to checkout the full schedule here.

See you there!

Want more hustling tips? Checkout my previous post Graduate’s Hustle Handbook To Entrepreneurship


You can tweet me @alecksonn or subscribe to my newsletter

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Adding a Little Sweetness to the Mix

Leah Kodner, Business Librarian from the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters each month for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently she connected with presenter Scott Dillon. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase on September 23, 2017.

TripAdvisor’s 2014 “TripIndex Cities” puts Minneapolis as the ninth most inexpensive city in the United States to have a night on the town. However, the average cost of two cocktails is still listed at $20. While not prohibitively expensive, $10 cocktails are not a thing that many people can afford to consume on a regular basis.

Scott Dillon was interesting in saving money by making his own cocktails, so he took a cocktail class and learned about shrubs. Shrubs are drink mixers made from apple cider vinegar, fresh fruit, and cane sugar. He was hooked and began making his own shrubs, and The Twisted Shrub was born.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Scott Dillon
Age: 43
City you live in: Edina
City of birth: Richmond, Va.
High school attended: Midlothian High School, Midlothian, Va.
Colleges attended: University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: The Twisted Shrub
Website:www.thetwistedshrub.com
Business Start Date: October 2015
Number of Employees: 1, soon to be 5
Number of Customers: 40 retail stores in the Twin Cities area, plus Amazon Prime

 

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. I spent 19 years in sales at General Mills before being let go in the downsizing efforts in 2014. So, with the support of my wife and family, I had the amazing opportunity to have a harmless mid-life crisis before deciding what to do with the rest of my career.

So I dabbled in many different hobbies (took magic lessons from a local magician, ushered for the Twins, passed Level 1 of the Master Sommelier certification process, to name a few) while trying to decide what to do next. One of my goals was to make better cocktails at home. I’ve grown tired of paying $12-$15 for high-end cocktails at bars so we signed up for a cocktail class at Parlour Bar in Minneapolis to learn about how to make better drinks. It was at this class where I first heard of shrubs.

I fell in love on the spot and decided I would never work for a company again. I was going to figure out how to start my own food company. Long story short, we launched The Twisted Shrub at the Linden Hills Farmers Market just 118 days after that fateful cocktail class. We are now on Amazon Prime and in 40+ retail stores across the Twin Cities with plans to accelerate in a significant way over the next six months and beyond.

Q. What is your business?
A. The Twisted Shrub specializes in the hand-crafted production of shrubs, also known as drinking vinegars. Shrubs have been around for centuries as a method to preserve fruit using vinegar and sugar. In the 1700s, the Colonials made shrubs from leftover fruit at the end of the harvest. They used the shrubs to flavor drinks in the winter months for sustenance and to provide people with necessary vitamins and nutrients until the following spring growing season.

We use just three simple, all-natural ingredients to make our shrubs: apple cider vinegar, fresh fruit, and 100 percent cane sugar. That’s it. We take our time, too: every batch of The Twisted Shrub takes two days to craft. Shrubs are drink mixers that create intensely complex, delicious, zing-filled cocktails and sodas without any muddling or infusion. For cocktails, simply add equal parts shrub, spirit, and soda water. For sodas, add three parts sparkling water to 1 part shrub for a refreshing, non-alcoholic quencher.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. The Twin Cities is chock full of amazing resources for startups, especially in food and beverage. Notably, AURI (Agricultural Utilization Research Institute) and GrowNorthMN have both been instrumental in helping us understand the resources available and steps to take in order to take an idea and make it into a business.

Q. What is the origin of the business?
A. Simply put, I wanted to make better, more interesting drinks (both alcoholic and non-alcoholic) in the comforts of my own home. Shrubs empower you to do that in just seconds.

Q. What problems does your business solve?
A. The Twisted Shrub provides an easy, fuss-free way to craft exceptionally delicious, complex, zing-filled, better-for-you cocktails and sodas at home at a fraction of the cost….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.JJHill.org.

 

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Be Truly Welcoming

As we wrap up Welcoming Week (Sept. 15 -24) at the James J. Hill Center we wanted to share some of the great tools and resources we used to work towards being more inclusive, welcoming and open to all communities.

The Hill is proud to be an active member of Welcoming America.  Launched in 2009, Welcoming America has spurred a growing movement across the United States. Their award-winning social entrepreneurship model is beginning to scale globally. As a non-profit, non-partisan organization, Welcoming America supports the many diverse communities and partners who are leading efforts to make their communities more vibrant places for all.

As communities change and grow, we all need to work together to ensure that all members of our communities, both new and old, feel welcome and included.  Tools to support this idea can be so helpful.  Welcoming America has provided those tools and resources.  They connect leaders, community, government and nonprofit sectors so they can work together to provide a network of support and communication.  These connections help bring great institutions and people together to make things happen.

During welcoming week the Hill leveraged new relationships to pull together a string of great institutions: The International Institute of Minnesota, Saint Paul College, Grow MN, Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, Neighborhood Development Center and many more. Through small dinners, large panel discussions and short presentations we discussed important and relevant topics such as diversity in our entrepreneurial community, the new American workforce and the needs of minority-owned businesses.  These conversations were enlightening and informative, but did show how many more steps we need to take to continue to build and grow and truly be a welcoming Minnesota.

To do this we must all get involved, join the conversation and remain open.  Here are some great tips that we have learned and initiated here at the Hill since joining Welcoming America.

First understand your local context:

1)      Look at local economic priorities and immigrant assets
2)      Look at the data that tells your local immigrant story
3)      Engage in existing programs and partners
4)      Talk with immigrant entrepreneurs

A great first step to try each of those four items is to join us at the James J. Hill Center. You can either review data through our free databases, engage in one of our topical presentations or panels or join one of our networking sessions.

Here are four things you can do on your own to support our local immigrant entrepreneurs:

1)      Be a champion
2)      Be a connector
3)      Fill in the gaps
4)      Make it your own

These steps will help us all grow and will ensure that our community and economy continues to prosper, grow and succeed. Visit the Hill or go to Welcomingamerican.org to find out more about how you can help your community become more inviting for all.

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Strong Data for Minority Own Businesses

There is very strong data to support investment in minority owned businesses in Minnesota. Data from the 2012 Survey of Business Organizations and the Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs 2015 reveal these important insights.

1) Minority business created more jobs than the largest employer in Minnesota: The Mayo Clinic, the largest MN employer, employed 39,000 jobs, estimate of DEED. Minority owned businesses as a group in comparison, employed over 70,000 people with an annual payroll of $1.7 billion.

2) The number of minority businesses grew faster than non-minority businesses: While the number of minority businesses grew by 53 percent during the period 2007-12, the number of non-minority businesses declined by 3 percent.

3) Minority business job growth increased at a higher rate than non-minority businesses: While minority businesses achieved a 68 percent growth in jobs during the period 2007-12, non-minority business jobs grew by only 10 percent.

4) The number of minority female owned businesses grew faster than female owned businesses: While the number of minority female businesses grew by 78 percent during the period 2007-12, the number of non-minority businesses grew by 19 percent.

5) The number of minority veteran owned businesses grew faster than veteran owned businesses: While the number of minority veteran businesses grew by 130 percent during the period 2007-12, the number of veteran businesses grew by 6 percent.

6) The fastest growing industries for minority firms were mining, utilities, wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, management and other services: The number of minority owned firms in five out of 18 industries more than doubled between 2007 and 2012.

Most of minority businesses are at the critical stage with sales between $100,000 and a million dollars. Policy attention is needed to help them grow. Our study of African immigrant entrepreneurs revealed that they needed most help with marketing and new product development apart from access to capital. Female entrepreneurs had unique needs compared to male entrepreneurs. Most of these entrepreneurs received very little help from public or non-profit organizations.

Research shows the minority economic status improves when minority entrepreneurs are successful as the wealth base of the community expands.

Bruce Corrie is Professor of Economics and Associate Vice President for University Relations at Concordia University-St. Paul.

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Mary Times Three

Travel up to the 2nd floor of the James J. Hill Center and you will find the “three Marys” on display on the north wall.

The first oil painting, “Mamie Hill at North Oaks,” was commissioned of Polish painter Jan Chelminski in 1886, who was famous for his equestrian paintings. Mamie is the oldest daughter of James and Mary Hill, and she would have been 18 years old in this painting. Two years later, she was engaged to Samuel Hill (of no previous relation).

The next framed art is a later depiction of Mamie, a charcoal drawing by F. Adolph Muller-Ury in 1900. Mamie, whose health was fragile, died in New York on April 13, 1947, and was buried in the Hill family section of Resurrection Cemetery in Mendota Heights, Minnesota.

Finally, there is a print of Mary Theresa Hill in her younger years. Mary was the wife of James J. Hill, and was responsible for the completion of the James J. Hill Reference Library. The Hill’s doors opened in 1921, but unfortunately both Mary and husband, James had passed by that time.

Learn more of the story behind the Hill Center, these images and the epic building in our Cabinet of Curiosity Tour every third Thursday at 10:30AM. In this one hour experience you will go back in time, up and down catwalks, through vaults and peek in hidden nooks and crannies.  Our September tour is coming up so get your tickets early!

 


Written by Lindsey Dyer, Director of Library Services, James J. Hill Center. If you have more questions about the reference library our our historic collection at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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“Wait Training”: It’s All Good

Junita Flowers is a writer, speaker, entrepreneur, mom and the owner of Favorable Treats. With more than 20 years of experience working with nonprofit organizations, she spent her career advocating for families and leading social change initiatives. Junita has learned the value of “waiting” during her years as an entrepreneur and business owner and shares her experiences with us each second Tuesday of the month.

“You don’t have the skill, talent, or ability to run a business!” were the words that rang out after a failed business planning discussion. I was devastated. Although the words were jarring to my ears, it was that level of discomfort that pushed me to transform my business from “just another cookie company” to a mission-driven, for-profit cookie company committed to doing good and making an impact.

While “giving-back” or funding social, cultural and environmental causes isn’t a new concept, more and more entrepreneurs are choosing to define their business success based on equal parts profits earned and purpose supported. Social entrepreneurship is all about doing good. From large scale operations to one-person startups, there are some common drivers that many social enterprises share. My top three are mission, meaning and money.

  1. Mission: Defining my business as a for-profit, mission-driven cookie company allows me to live out my life’s purpose both personally and professionally. Connecting my company’s why we do good things with the how we do good within our community allows us to be an active contributor in creating the good we wish to see and experience in our world.
  2. Meaning: Consumers want to feel good about the purchases they make. They want to make purchases that align with their values. I have the opportunity to connect my customers to a product they love and support a cause they care about. By focusing on meaning, my customers and I become partners in doing good.
  3. Money: At the core of it all, money funds mission! The ability to generate a profit to take care of my family and invest in my community creates a business model that keeps on giving. If my business does not make money, I have limited my ability to make an impact. Building a business from scratch, experiencing each financial milestone and busting your hind parts to reach profitability…is all good.

My company makes good cookies. “We do good things” is Favorable Treats commitment to delivering a delicious, scratch-made product, while making an impact. I recently had the opportunity to share my business journey and inspiration for Favorable Treats on the award winning podcast, Social Entrepreneur, listen by clicking here.

I would love to hear from you. How are you using your business for good? As a consumer, how important is a company’s mission when making purchasing decisions? You can send your reply here.


You can read more about Junita Flowers on her website at favorabletreats.com. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.   In addition we are pleased to have Junita join us at the  James J. Hill Center on October 26th from 9AM to 10AM  as she moderates our TAKING THE LEAD panel discussion focusing on the complex and rewarding ecosystem of women entrepreneurs.  This month’s topic will be on the “Growth Strategies and Plateau Pains ” This program is free and open to the public.  

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She Tells Rochester’s Startup Stories

Leah Kodner, Business Librarian from the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters each month for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently she connected with presenter Amanda Leightner. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase on September 9, 2017.

Startups need publicity. Without publicity, nobody will know that a startup exists, what it does, or why it matters.

Startups also benefit from being part of a startup community, where entrepreneurs support one another and share their expertise. These startup communities also need publicity, in order to share news about events, resources for entrepreneurs, and more.

Amanda Leightner was impressed with the Rochester startup community but saw that it lacked publicity. She started Rochester Rising both to provide publicity for Rochester entrepreneurs and to inform outsiders of all that the Rochester startup community has to offer.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Amanda Leightner
Age: 32
City you live in: Rochester
City of birth: Pittsburgh, Pa.
High school attended: Highlands High School, Natrona Heights, Pa.
Colleges attended: Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa.

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Rochester Rising
Website: www.rochesterrising.org
Business Start Date: July 18, 2016
Number of Employees: 1

 

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. I’m a trained molecular biologist with over 12 years of experience in biomedical research. Even though I spent 6 years obtaining a PhD and continued to do postdoctoral studies, I knew that a career in science was not for me. After graduating from Mayo Graduate School, I decided to do my postdoctoral research at the UMN and spend that time gaining experience to try doing something else.

I had always enjoyed writing, and thought I could explore a career as a science or medical writer, but at the time I lacked the experience. I did an internship with Life Science Alley Association, where I really got interested in the science business community in Minnesota.

Afterwards, I got in touch with a researcher I had worked with at Mayo Clinic, Jamie Sundsbak, who ran a supportive group for life science entrepreneurs in Rochester called BioAM. A few months later, I received a call from Jamie asking me to help him build up a website and online presence of BioAM and help share stories of life science innovation in Minnesota.I wrote stories about science entrepreneurship around the Minneapolis area and built up this web presence for about a year and a half, calling it Life Science Nexus.

In January 2016, I completely took over running and operating Life Science Nexus. That May, I decided to go full in on being an entrepreneur myself with the online news site. I moved from Minneapolis back to Rochester to be in closer contact with Jamie as I grew the business. After living in Rochester for only a few weeks, I realized how much the entrepreneurial community as a whole was growing, and how little anyone was talking about it.

In July, Life Science Nexus was pivoted into Rochester Rising to amplify the stories of all entrepreneurship, expanding beyond life sciences, and focusing in on the Rochester area. Now I run all aspects of the business as a solo entrepreneur.

Q. What is your business?
A. Rochester Rising is an online news site that amplifies the stories of entrepreneurship occurring in Rochester. We put out several articles and a podcast every week taking an in-depth look at Rochester startups and innovative small businesses and really take the time to understand the person behind the business and how they started it in Rochester.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. The entrepreneurial community in Rochester is a fantastic resource. You can always find someone who is a few steps ahead of you who is willing to give advice and encouragement.

Q. What problems does your business solve?
A. Even a few years ago, there was not much of an entrepreneurial community in Rochester. While still small, we now have an entrepreneurial core that is growing every day…READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.JJHill.org.

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The American Hospital Directory: A Hidden Gem

The region spanning from the Twin Cities metro area down to Rochester is such a hotbed of healthcare organizations and medical device companies that it’s known as “Medical Alley.” In fact, a 2015 article by EMSI notes that the Twin Cities Medical Alley has far more medical-related jobs than any other metro area in the United States, over 10,000 more than New York. Minnesota is clearly a leader in the medical industry housing such influential companies as 3M, Medtronic, the Mayo Clinic and the Medical Alley Association.

The business reference library at the James J. Hill Center is here to help professionals in the medical device industry find the information they need. We offer a highly specialized database, the American Hospital Directory.  This database can be accessed for free at the Hill Center in downtown Saint Paul.

The American Hospital Directory is a tool that medical device sales professionals find invaluable for finding detailed information about hospitals in their market. Data is collected from both public and private sources such as Medicare claims, hospital cost reports and commercial licencors. Using this directory, you can learn a hospital’s specialties, bed count, revenue broken down by services and more.

This type of research is a vital tool in the medical field.  To have the ability to compare and contrast hospitals by patient statistics, revenue and services puts you at the top of your game and on the road to success. Stop by the Hill today, have a conversation with one of our business librarians and use this hidden gem.


Written by: Leah Kodner, Business Librarian, James J. Hill Center.

If you have more questions about the reference library at the James J. Hill Center please contact 651-265-5500 or hillreferencelibrary@jjhill.org.

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Soft Skills Revolution: Memorization

“Chris Carlson is an entrepreneur, actor,  lawyer and the founder of NarrativePros dedicated to coaching stronger connections. Chris is setting the standard for soft skills training across the region and will be sharing his tips and tricks in our monthly blog Soft Skills Revolution. Come back the first Tuesday of each month and learn key steps to unleash your efficiency, effectiveness and maximize your input.

Memorization – Helping Your Audience by Helping Yourself

Memorization is a misunderstood tool speakers don’t use enough. Proper memorization techniques can increase your comfort and audience appeal exponentially. The secret begins and ends with a simple question.

What does it mean?

When I work with someone on a presentation I ask them a series of questions:

What are you telling me?
How is it different?
Why should I care?

Audiences will answer those questions with or without you. Speakers who embrace this will be in a better position to play a role in their own fate. Speakers who ignore this, risk the audience missing the point.

The effective way to memorize anything begins with understanding its meaning. An actor memorizing a role begins by understanding the plot of the play.

Memorization Gets a Bad Rap

Some people think memorization is a dirty word. First, it does take work and second even some “experts” say you might sound “memorized”.

I’m here to tell you it’s an worthwhile investment. Don’t let the fear of failure or sounding “memorized” dissuade you. Understanding how memorization really works lets you adjust your focus appropriately.

I don’t recommend trying to memorize your whole speech, word for word. I do strongly recommend memorizing parts of it. The payoff is huge. You’ll be more comfortable and confident with your message and this will delight and engage your audience. The result is giving AND leaving them with a better sense of your intended meaning.

Piece by Piece

You can make the most of memorization if you approach it piece by piece. Not word by word. Think of it as a series of interconnected “meanings.”

The most important “meaning” you need to nail down is the Big Idea”. What does your speech mean to your audience? This is something you need to know so well that you can say it in your sleep. Again, if you don’t know what your speech means, how can you expect your audience to?

And if it’s hard for you to memorize, that means it is going to be hard for the audience to hear. Make the meaning clear, concise and compelling.

Brick by Brick

If you’re on a roll and ambitious, memorize the teeny, tiny bricks of meaning: the words. Think of the entire structure of memorization as a series of interconnecting lego-bricks each building on one other.  Each brick is a nugget of meaning. Get to know each of them intimately. This is the fundamental principle to mnemonic techniques:

– Chunking: Turning strings of letters or numbers into more meaningful bits
Visualization: Transforming meaning into vivid images that you can link together.
–  Memory Palaces: Taking images and placing them in a familiar location like your home.

No matter how deep you go down” memory lane” try to always memorize the first minute of your speech. Trust me, your audience will thank you and you will be helping yourself. Learn your part and play your role. You will be amazed by the results.


Guest writer:
 Chris Carlson
Visit @NarrativePros for more information.

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Startup Secrets and Sh#$ to Know: Graduate’s Hustle Handbook To Entrepreneurship

Aleckson Nyamwaya has his beat on the pulse of the startup world in MN.  He is an Associate at @gener8tor, contributor for @startupgrind, ambassador for @1millioncupsspl and a lover of all things tech & startups. We are pleased to have his monthly insight with our blog “Startup Secrets and Sh#$ to Know.”  Check back each month for his thoughts, observations and featured companies.

Recent Graduate’s Hustle Handbook To Entrepreneurship

Are you a recent grad? Want to get involved with entrepreneurship?

What you need are friends.

Other people will call them “connections” but I think that’s a buzzword that doesn’t mean anything anymore.

To do this, you’ll need a healthy combination of online and offline hustling…

  1.  Discover and engage with them online
  2. Connect with them in person

Easy right?

Below I’ve outlined steps on how you can discover the right people and connect with them. Ask good questions and ask for advice – what would they do if they were in your position? Finally, provide value. Literally ask them how you can help!

1. What is your goal?

What is your journey, why are you doing this? What is your end goal.
Understanding your end goal will help you create a more concrete plan and will also keep you motivated when you are thinking about quitting.

2. Get on Twitter

Follow and engage with local influences on Twitter with the goal of setting up a meeting in real life. Once you set up a live meeting, you are ready for step 4.

Influences can be journalist who write about your local internship scene, meetup and hackathon hosts, current founders, entrepreneurs with exits, investors, people who lead organizations that are dedicated to serving entrepreneurs etc.

3. Live events

Other good places to meet people involved with startups/tech and entrepreneurship are Meetups, hackathons, reach out to local organizations like accelerators, venture firms, current startups, etc.

4. Share your story

Once you’ve connected with local influences and people who are where you want to be, ask them questions. Find out how they got where they are today!

– What did they do to get here?
– Share your story.
– What would they do if they were in your shoes?

At the end of the meeting ask them “how can I help you?”

5. Provide value

How will you provide value?

Are you a coder? Are you a Google Analytics wizard? Facebook ads? Salesforce? Business development? Maybe you’ve had a few projects to show for it, etc. Offering services for free is a common “get-your-foot-in-the-door-technique.”

It’s 2017, if you can Google, you have a special skill.

At the very least you can manage a social media account. So don’t even say that you don’t have any skills.

Pro-Tips

  • Checkout the business section of your local newspaper, or local entrepreneurship blog
  • Angel lists are a great place to find startups
  • If a startup recently raised money ,chances are they are hiring
  • Same with VC firms
  • Follow up with emails within 1 hour (or 24 hours max)

Conclusion

Stick to the process and you will eventually luck out and connect with someone who is gracious enough to give you a shot.

When you do, work you butt off, under promise, over deliver and go above and beyond. The last thing you want to do is disrespect and embarrass the person who stuck their neck out for you.

If you drop the ball, don’t worry it happens, do not make this a habit. Follow up ASAP and remember, actions speak louder than words.


You can tweet me @alecksonn or subscribe to my newsletter

 

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