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A New Livestock for a New Minnesota

There is no handbook for cricket farming, Eric Palen will tell you. If you want to raise urban chickens there is a way to do that. If you want to start a cattle ranch there are others who have gone before. But when you have founded Minnesota’s first edible insect farm you have to do things the old fashioned way—you have to figure it out yourself.

“[North Star Crickets is] continuing in Minnesota’s agricultural tradition but looking to the future at how food production needs to change to accommodate a growing population, food security, [and] climate change,” says Eric.

The idea for North Star Crickets began percolating in Eric’s mind sometime after 2013 when the United Nations released a report advocating for edible insects as a key component in the future of sustainable food production. As countries become more affluent their demand for protein grows. At the same time, a growing global population means less land to utilize for food production.

We know first hand in a place like Minnesota that raising a protein source like beef cattle requires a lot of land space, feed, and water. What if there was a way to produce protein more efficiently with less space and fewer resources?

Enter the cricket.

Eric has done his research and has a plethora of reasons to support the viability and benefit of farming crickets as a new protein-rich livestock. Not only are crickets superior to cattle in resource usage, they also produce far fewer greenhouse gasses and they are more simple to process—100% of a cricket is edible food as compared to 40% of a cow.

In addition to being a protein source, crickets are also very nutrient dense boasting an impressive combination of iron, calcium, and vitamin B12 among other health benefits.

What do they taste like?

“That is like asking what do vegetables taste like,” says Eric. “There is a whole range of tastes and flavors and applications.”

After harvesting his crickets (which can be done year-round by the way), Eric either roasts a batch in the oven and flavors them for snacking or grinds them into a powder that can be added to or substituted for flour in baked goods.

Since its launch in the past year, North Star Crickets has formed some unique local business partnerships. Eric has teamed up with T-Rex Cookie on a limited run of chocolate “chirp” cookies and Lake Monster Brewing to upcycle their spent brewing grain as cricket feed.

North Star Crickets is the first business of its kind in Minnesota and one of only a handful of other edible insect companies in the nation. That said, Eric’s primary contribution to the edible insect market—his “original thinker” edge—is still emerging. The demand is greater than what he is able to supply. Right now he is looking for an investor and business partner to expand his operation.

In the meantime, Eric is perfecting his process and writing the proverbial handbook for cricket farmers to come.

To learn more about North Star Crickets follow them on social @northstarcrickets.

Written by Christopher Christenson, Program & Event Coordinator, at the James J. Hill Center. Have an idea of a person or organization to feature in this series? Send your recommendations to christopher@jjhill.org.

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A Matter of Perspective

Check back each month for the Original Thinker Series as we explore local innovation in entrepreneurship, the arts, and our community one pioneering mind at a time.

Dario Otero, CEO of Youth Lens 360, has created a new kind of media production company—one that puts youth behind the camera on real world projects.

“I knew that the work was out there and that young people [were] already show[ing] up with such brilliant ideas and already knew how to use technology at a very high level,” says Dario.

Youth Lens 360 is the next step in a career Dario has spent investing in young people. As an educator, Dario felt that the classroom only allowed students to take their digital media skills so far.

“In school […] the kids don’t actually make money,” says Dario.

By contrast, Youth Lens 360 gives students paid contract experience running cameras, editing footage, recording voice over, and ultimately delivering complete products to clients.

“They’re doing real world work for money, contracting with people and starting their own companies,” says Dario. “They’ve got to learn how to submit an invoice or make a proposal or figure out how to do this work.”

Beyond the parameters of each job, Dario makes sure his young crew members are well supported. He helps with transportation, proper business attire, and lunch meetings to talk through next steps.

With the rapid growth of the gig economy, Youth Lens 360 is equipping young people with the skills they need to strike out on their own in the digital media industry—especially those who are currently underrepresented in media production.

“A lot of times when we walk into the room and we’re the interview crew—75-85% of us are youth of color and young people learning this craft—it really shocks people,” says Dario. “They love it because it’s a different style and a different approach to the interview.”

At the heart of it, Dario is an original thinker because he believes that there is intrinsic value in the perspective young people bring to a project. He does not see them as mere amateurs learning a craft but as a valuable assets that companies can tap into precisely because of their age.

“People are paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to these marketing companies to go out and find young people between the ages of 14-24 to see if they like this new product,” says Dario. “We have a creative process that we can go through with companies that can help them position their product or service in a way that they may never have seen it before.”

To learn more about Youth Lens 360, view past projects, or to hire them visit their website www.youthlens360.com.


Written by Christopher Christenson, Program & Event Coordinator, at the James J. Hill Center. Have an idea of a person or organization to feature in this series? Send your recommendations to 
christopher@jjhill.org.

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It All Adds Up: Fall Forward – Embracing Changing and Preparing for Growth

It’s that time of year when everyone senses the reality that change is in the air. The weather shifts to crisp and cool days, the relaxation from the warmth of summer shifts to an urgency of seizing the daylight and the landscape of nature celebrates the beauty of change with richness, depth and beauty.

Fall is a natural season of change and for me, it represents new beginnings. Personally, it’s the start of a new school year and a shift in the daily at-home routine with my family. In my business, it’s a time for me to assess business outcomes and productivity and make necessary changes to ensure a strong finish by year end. However, learning to celebrate and grow from the natural progression of change required a mindset shift and forming new habits.

I’ve always operated at two speeds…fast and asleep. There wasn’t anything in between. I walked fast. I talked fast. I drove fast. I was always on the go. While the constant activity created a track record of getting things done, it also came with many missteps, fatigue and avoidable mistakes.

I continued at that fast pace because I thought it was necessary in order to make up for my perception of “lost time”. When the mistakes happened, I just picked up the pace and tried to accomplish more, instead of slowing down to process the mistakes, make necessary changes and celebrate the wins. This practice of always being on the go at a high speed was robbing me of my opportunity to be most effective, to enjoy progress and to learn from missteps. The high speed of constant movement created increased levels of anxiety and I was on the path toward self sabotage. Something clearly needed to change.

As solo-preneurs and small business owners, it can be so easy to fall into the trap of working IN your business and saving little time for working ON your business. While this pattern of constant movement can produce results of getting things done, it also can stagnate growth and create burnout.

It is so important to incorporate external learning communities and opportunities for growth as leaders and decision makers. I have found it to be both scary and liberating to step outside of my high speed of busyness in exchange for the thoughtful work of slowing down to increase my growth capacity. Slowing down brings me face to face with the things I have mastered, but also the areas in which I need to grow or completely outsource. Slowing down to reflect, plan and proceed takes time but can yield powerful results.

I am naturally wired for constant movement at high speeds, but I am most effective when I build in the benefits of a slower pace. For me, slowing down will always be a work-in-process. As a small business owner, my goal is to effectively balance the workload of growth and success and the benefits of slowing down for reflection and necessary change. I am definitely up for the challenge.

I’d love to hear from you. How do you prepare for growth as an entrepreneur? How have you incorporated external learning communities within your growth strategy? Send your comments to me by clicking here.

 

 

You can read more about Junita Flowers on her website junitasjar.com. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

 

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Startup Showcase: Busy Baby Mat Keeps Babies Busy So You Can Eat

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently we connected with presenter Beth Fynbo. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on August 26, 2018. 

According to Reuters Top Trends in Baby and Child Care Market 2018 parents are constantly on the lookout for more convenient ways to make baby and child care easier. Grand View Research states that the global baby product market is expected to reach $121 billion by 2025. Not a bad business to jump into when you have an idea. This is exactly what Beth Fynbo did when she realized there was something missing from her baby equipment. With tenacity and resourcefulness, she has taken her idea into action. Beth’s new invention busies babies while putting restaurants and mommies at rest.

 COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Busy Baby LLC
Website: busybabymat.com
Business Start Date: Established the LLC in July 2017. Currently still working on product development and building the business. Hoping to have first sales in December 2018.
Number of Employees:  1
Number of Customers: No customers, yet.

PROFILE

Name: Beth Fynbo
Age: 41
City you live in: Oronoco, Minn.
College attended: Bachelor program for Business Management at MSU-Mankato after the Army and then earned a Master of Business with a concentration in Project Management from Colorado Technical University.

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A.  I was born and raised the daughter of an entrepreneur in Albert Lea, Minn. I started college at Minnesota State University, Mankato before joining the United States Army for a 10-year adventure around the world. I eventually returned to Mankato and completed my undergrad in Business Management. I then went on to complete a Master’s degree program in Business Management with a concentration in Project Management. I’ve been excelling in corporate work for the past 7 years, but have always felt a calling toward entrepreneurship.

Q. What is your business?
A. For parents of 6 to 16-month-old babies who like to eat out, but don’t like the stress of keeping the baby entertained, the Busy Baby Mat is here for you. The Busy Baby Mat’s tether system allows caregivers to attach a baby’s items to the mat, and regardless of an accidental drop or toss, they will stay within arm’s reach. The Busy Baby Mat also keeps baby protected from surface germs and has a place to put their food. What makes Busy Baby better are the suction cups under the mat that keep it in place and the tethers that keep toys or pacifiers within reach. As a bonus, the first accessories to the Busy Baby Mat, salt and pepper teething toys, come with the restaurant set. It all rolls up into a convenient carrying case that fits in most diaper bags and purses.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. I was extremely fortunate to discover Bunker Labs, an organization that helps veteran entrepreneurs on their journeys. Through their launch lab program, a 12-week entrepreneurship course, I was able to learn how to start a business and was able to quickly develop a network of mentors to help me along the way.

Q. What is the origin of the business?
A.  The idea came to me as I ate lunch with a few girlfriends and their young children. The babies were constantly reaching for things they couldn’t have, and then when the moms would give them something to play with, they would just throw it on the floor. It was so distracting! That night, I scoured the internet for something to buy that I could take with me to restaurants once my son was old enough to sit up in the high chair. When I couldn’t find something that would work, I started making it on my own from things around the house. My best friend had a baby the week after me, so I made one for her too. Another friend saw it in action and asked for one as well.

Q. What problems does your business solve?
A. Busy Baby takes some of the stress out of taking an infant or toddler out to eat. The main problem our product solves is keeping baby busy at the restaurant. It keeps all the toys within reach and everything free from germs, and as an added bonus, the silicone deadens the sound of banging….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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The Community’s the Thing

Check back each month for the Original Thinker Series as we explore local innovation in entrepreneurship, the arts, and our community one pioneering mind at a time.

“Most plays you see were written by one person based on a what or a why,” says Leah Cooper, Co-Artistic Director at Wonderlust Productions. “We start with who.”

Leah, along with her Co-Artistic Director, Alan Berks, founded Wonderlust to tell stories with and about communities—specifically those that are hidden, marginalized, or plagued by a single media narrative. In the spirit of theater companies like Cornerstone in Los Angeles, Wonderlust incorporates community members (the who) in the research, design, and production of stories based on their complex and universal experiences within that community.

“In a way, it’s the original way people made theater,” says Leah. “They sat around and shared stories with each other and made a play out of it.”

So, how does it work?

After identifying a community with an untold story, the Wonderlust team works with organizations already serving that community to gather direct input from their constituents.

“We actively target diversity, both vertically and horizontally,” says Leah. “Horizontally is what people usually mean—demographics, gender, class, all that sort of thing. Vertically is across the power hierarchy that is in the community.”

Within these diverse story circles, the Wonderlust team listens for both the commonalities and contradictions in what people believe is the truth about the community. After what can be years participating in this process, the writers look for a classic storyline that can be adapted to encompass the complexity of experience entrusted to them.

“[At this point] we invite community members back to the table, so to speak, or the rehearsal room and we mix them together with professionals from our ensemble,” says Leah.

After many public readings, workshops, and rewrites, the final production includes both trained performers and community members sharing the same stage.

“It gives [community members] an opportunity to bear witness to somebody else’s experience which is kind of, weirdly, a sacred experience,” says Leah. “By entering into that it creates a reverence that they bring to it that ends up conveying a really similar quality to that created by professional artists.”

Though they did not originate this methodology for storytelling, the Wonderlust team has certainly made it their own. They are even beginning to experiment with new mediums for community stories—virtual reality, graphic novels, ritual, and sound installation. But what really sets Leah and the Wonderlust team apart as original thinkers is their willingness to deeply listen to people no matter who they are.

“This is a thing we’ve learned,” says Leah. “It doesn’t matter how important people are, how extroverted or introverted—nobody feels heard. This is a human thing.”

To learn more about Wonderlust Productions, view past projects, and catch upcoming performances visit their website wonderlustproductions.org.

 


Written by Christopher Christenson, Program & Event Coordinator, at the James J. Hill Center. Have an idea of a person or organization to feature in this series? Send your recommendations to 
christopher@jjhill.org.

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It All Adds Up: Hope Munches On

Before you take a step, before your situation changes, before you even have the answers to create change…you just need to grasp the concept of hope. You have to know there is a chance for something better and then allow the story to unfold. Trust me…it’s easier said than done, but it has to be done.

In November 2015, my business journey shifted. I was holding onto a fledgling cookie company as if it were a million dollar operation when in reality it was only generating enough revenue to be a mere side hustle. The cookie company had the potential for growth, but I didn’t have the capacity to breathe life into it. That is until my expectations shifted and I settled for the uncertainty of what if there is more?

On July 31, 2018, I celebrated the result of taking a chance on hope, through the brand unveiling and business launch of my cookie company, now known as Junita’s Jar. Surrounded by walls and books and periodicals dedicated to all things business development and standing under the portrait of the well known dreamer and entrepreneur, Mr. James J. Hill, I stood before one hundred or so friends and supporters sharing the news of the next chapter in my journey of entrepreneurship. I stood before them as I stepped into the intersection where the uncertainty of hope meets the power of a dream.

Filled with table of cookies and conversation starters, my business launch was designed to introduce our deliciously wholesome cookies while creating the opportunity to exchange hope-filled interactions. From four amazing speakers, each sharing their personal story of trauma to triumph, Junita’s Jar welcomed a movement celebrating the impact of hope. Some had tears of inspiration others had hearts overflowing with the anticipation of doing good, but everyone understood the powerful impact of hope-filled communities.

Launching a business is grueling work. Launching a movement of hope-filled possibilities makes the work a little sweeter. As I reflect upon my business journey over the past three years, and think about what I know for sure, I can tell you three important business altering lessons that have dramatically impacted my growth.

  1. You must say yes to the difficult things.
  2. Build your network to increase your net worth.
  3. Celebrate the small steps along the way.

I could share story upon story that speaks to the growth I’ve experienced from these three lessons, but I’ll save that for the book. In the meantime, I want to send a special thank to the community of supporters and friends for joining me on this journey and a special thank you to the James J. Hill Center team for creating an opportunity for me to say yes.

As always, I would love to hear from you. Send me an email or share via social media, your story of embracing hope and executing your dream. At the end of the day, remember hope is a game changer.

 


You can read more about Junita Flowers on her website junitasjar.com. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

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Startup Showcase: Her Just Desserts Are Just That

Each month the James J. Hill Center interviews 1 Million Cup presenters for the Startup Showcase feature in the Pioneer Press.  Recently we connected with presenter Junita Flowers. See interview as seen in the Pioneer Press Startup Showcase originally posted on July 28, 2018. 

There is a new trend in the way businesses are operating and interacting with their customers.  According to a recent study by Deloitte’s 2018 Global Human Capital Trends, “Organizations are no longer judged only for their financial performance, or even the quality of their products or services. Rather, they are being evaluated on the basis of their impact on society at large –transforming them from business enterprises into social enterprises.”

Social enterprises, according to Social Enterprise Alliance, are, “Organizations that address a basic unmet need or solve a social problem through a market-driven approach.”

Junita Flowers and her company Junita’s Jar is doing exactly that. As a social entrepreneur she is working to solve a critical problem and build a sustainable business one delicious crumb at a time. With her amazing cookies made with love she is destined to improve people’s lives.

ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE

Name: Junita Flowers
Age: 45
City you live in: Brooklyn Park
City of birth: St. Paul
College attended: University of Minnesota

COMPANY PROFILE

Name of company: Junita’s Jar
Website: junitasjar.com
Twitter: @JunitaLFlowers
Business Start Date: June 2018
Number of Employees: 2

 

Q&A

Q. What led to this point?
A. I grew up in a very large immediate and extended family, so we spent a lot of time in the kitchen making food for a lot of people. Some of my best childhood memories stem from random conversations shared while prepping food and washing dishes. From birthday treats to holiday desserts, all of the cakes, cookies and pies were made from scratch by my mother and grandmother. After college and settling into my career within the nonprofit sector, I finally had some free time to recreate the recipes from my childhood. After a brief dessert Q&A conversation with my grandmother, I realized none of my favorite recipes were written down. With a goal of baking for myself, I began visiting with my grandmother, watching her re-create my favorite desserts while I recorded the ingredients and measurements. Many years later, I began baking just for fun, to celebrate special occasions with friends. This eventually led to the beginning of my cookie company.

Q. What is your business?
A. Founded upon my favorite childhood recipes and inspired by my personal path of overcoming domestic violence, Junita’s Jar is a mission-driven cookie company producing deliciously wholesome, ready-to-bake cookie dough and grab ’n’ go mini-cookie snack packs. Junita’s Jar is dedicated to making the taste of homemade cookies easy, accessible and super convenient for every day snack time options. We are more than a cookie company. We are on a mission to create a hope-fueled movement with every cookie purchase. We want to see people live well in well-loved moments. To encourage them to exceed expectations, time and time again. To empower a world without abuse. For those reasons, a portion of Junita’s Jar profits is donated to support education and awareness initiatives dedicated to ending relationship violence.

Q. Where do you go for help when you need it?
A. The Twin Cities is filled with so many opportunities to nurture, support and encourage entrepreneurs at every level along the business journey. In addition to the continuous support from my family and friends, I have received support and training from a handful of various service organizations, corporations, nonprofit organizations and networking groups.

Q. What is the origin of the business?
A. In 2006, I started my first cookie company, Favorable Treats, at a local farmer’s market and a few pop-up shops. I operated Favorable Treats for 12 years, however, I had to stop and restart my business on three separate occasions due to a toxic and abusive relationship. Each time that I restarted Favorable Treats, I would experience a little more growth than the previous time, but it was a painfully difficult process….READ FULL ARTICLE

 

You can hear from startups like this one each Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. at the James J. Hill Center during 1 Million Cups St. Paul. The James J. Hill Center is a nonprofit in downtown St. Paul that provides access to business research, educational programming and a place to work. The Hill is open to the public 8AM – 4PM, Monday-Thursday. To keep updated on what startup is presenting next or to apply to present, visit www.jjhill.org

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A Drumstick is Just a Drumstick

Check back each month for the Original Thinker Series as we explore local innovation in entrepreneurship, the arts, and our community one pioneering mind at a time.

Modern drumstick design is fairly standard. Most of us recognize a drumstick as a long, thin, hardwood cylinder with a tapered end. Carl Bennett, lifelong drummer and founder of TREE(3), is challenging all of those conventions.

“It was arrived at strictly by necessity for myself on a really organic level,” says Carl. “I was playing fairly regularly with a blues/classic rock band and we were doing full sets—three hours or four hours at a gig.” To combat fatigue, Carl began wearing bicycle gloves or using essential oils and ointments for his forearm muscles. But neither solution was comprehensive or convenient. So Carl decided to revisit an idea he had as a young drummer.

“As a teenager,” says Carl, “I sawed off the broken end of my broken drumsticks [the tapered end]. They were shorter and I was actually playing like Keith Moon. I was able to play crazy fast stuff and I could play a lot longer.”

Enter the TREE(3) drumstick. Each is a simple cylinder with no tapered end. They are slightly shorter than traditional drumsticks and are made out of American Poplar: a lightweight, slightly flexible material riding the line between softwood and hardwood. They are handmade and sold in trinity sets—“a pair and a spare.”

The TREE(3) design not only solves for fatigue, it makes for faster playing and it recovers a forgotten sound. Carl explains that the tapered tip of the modern drumstick is a tradition passed down from military drummers of the Revolutionary War and before. “They would literally take tree branches and whittle them down with their pocketknives,” says Carl. “They found if they had a tip on there it was a sharper sound. But what was lost all these hundreds of years was a really fat, authoritative sound—the old clubs of the Anglo-Saxon days.”

Carl is an original thinker by nature. Perhaps the key is that he is genuinely curious about the world. Like many great designers or inventors he is interested in how things came to be and what we have lost or gained in the process. Preserve the good of the new and recover the good of the past.

“For many years cars were four wheel vehicles and fairly recently people started thinking they could be three wheels,” says Carl. “It’s just one of those things—somebody has to get back to what this is really all about […] a drumstick is just a drumstick.”

For those marching to the beat of their own drum, Carl Bennett is making your drumsticks.

Check out @tree3drumsticks on Facebook or visit tree3drumsticks.com.

 


Written by Christopher Christenson, Program & Event Coordinator, at the James J. Hill Center. Have an idea of a person or organization to feature in this series? Send your recommendations to 
christopher@jjhill.org.

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A Consumer’s Guide to Women’s Equity

Check back each month for the Original Thinker Series as we explore local innovation in entrepreneurship, the arts, and our community one pioneering mind at a time.

It is hard not to be optimistic after a conversation with Kateri Ruiz, founder of MAIA.community. Kateri is committed to emboldening women’s equity and has vowed that she “will not cease until all data sets can prove it.” Her approach to gender equity work: speak passionately and carry a big directory.

MAIA is a free access directory of women-owned businesses across the nation. It is built for the conscious consumer who wants to spend their money in alignment with their values—especially when it comes to gender equity. Companies with at least 50% or greater female representation in the highest levels of leadership are listed for free with the option to purchase a premium listing for greater visibility.

The idea for MAIA began when Kateri and her husband started paying attention to the products and services they were bringing into their home. They put them through a litmus test: were these products and services ideated by, created by, or done in a holistic image of a woman? After failing month after month to match their spending with the 5:1 female to male ratio of their household, Kateri realized there was a larger problem to solve. “Why is this so hard,” says Kateri. “Women owned firms are everywhere.”

Kateri began earnestly gathering every list of women-owned businesses she could get her hands on. (Shameless plug: She did some of her research at the James J. Hill Center.) What she realized in the process was that these lists are plentiful but scattered. They are often owned by groups or associations and accessible only to paying members. Additionally, most are designed for business-to-business use and not for the consumer.

Someone needed to gather all these lists into one place and make them searchable and user-friendly to the everyday person trying to live a socially conscious life. Thus MAIA was born. “We wanted to make it easier for consumers to have that level of information,” says Kateri. “So that consumers could spend their money in a way that meant something to them.”

Women make up nearly half of the workforce in the United States (46.9%). Yet, only 5% of S&P 500 companies have a female CEO and only 21.2% of board seats in these same companies are filled by women. “The disparity between who is doing the work and who is leading the companies we find to be a systemic barrier,” says Kateri.

After spending a career in workforce solutions, Kateri is taking the reverse approach with MAIA to influence systemic change. “If we are being told that we cannot figure out how to solve gender pay parity for another 50 years… then perhaps we should move outside of that status quo and drive a more female-centric economy—potentially on its own,” says Kateri. This is what makes Kateri an original thinker. She is harnessing the free information philosophy of the Internet to allow us to support the businesses—and the women leading them—that we’d like to see more of in the world.

“We believe that when women are involved equally at the highest levels of leadership where we ideate, where we create, where we are making the decisions… that can yield a more holistic product and solution,” says Kateri.

To join the MAIA Community visit their website maia.community or reach out to the team at info@maia.community.

 


Written by Christopher Christenson, Program & Event Coordinator, at the James J. Hill Center. Have an idea of a person or organization to feature in this series? Send your recommendations to 
christopher@jjhill.org.

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